Ponerorchis graminifolia

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naoki

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This is from Shikoku Garden via Kusamono Gardens. I got them this spring (here is the previous thread). They turned out to be very pretty, so I'm sharing the photos here!

There are many natural variation as well as artificially selected variation in the flower color, shape, and leaf variegation. It is a popular orchids in Japan similar to Neofinetia falcata or Dendrobium moniliforme. It is called Uchouran in Japan, and they frequently use chinese characters, which means "Butterfly wing orchids". Some people recently made up the Chinese character, so it is not the origin of the name. In 1960-70's, cultivation of this species became really popular, and lots of plants were collected since people were paying lots of money for rare varieties. But in 1980-90's, the mass production became possible via asymbiotic germination, and the price dropped. Because of the excessive collection, they are sadly still rare in nature.

Shikoku Garden seems to sell "mixed color" without specifying the variety. The one I got is probably categorized as Niou-kei Shiroji-Kouitten-ka (仁王系白地紅一点花) type. Niou-kei means niou-lineage. Niou is a guardian of Buddhism temple (info in Wikipedia). There was a variety called Niou, which had a large lip. So those with a large lip is called Niou-kei (descendants from Niou). Shiroji means white base. Typical individual has pink/purple color. Kouitten-ka means flowers with Red spot. Typical ones have bunch of dots on the lip, but this one has a big blob of purple (well, Japanese "red" has a wider meaning, and it could include purplish color).

A single big spot in pink background can be found in nature, and it is a recessive trait. White background is also found in nature, and it is also a recessive trait. So this individual is a double recessive homozygotes created artificially by crossing.

The last time I tried this species, I could keep it only 2 seasons or so (in other words, I don't know what I'm doing). I hope that I'll do better this time.

Notice that the left one, which is still opening, has a bit more pink on the dorsal sepal. I'm not sure if this is considered as Shiroji (white base).

Ponerorchis graminifolia on Flickr


Ponerorchis graminifolia on Flickr

The gradation of red to pink is so wonderful:

Ponerorchis graminifolia on Flickr


Ponerorchis graminifolia on Flickr


Ponerorchis graminifolia on Flickr
 

Linus_Cello

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Mine are in bud and hopefully will bloom (from same vendor); are you doing anything different from their instructions to try to over-winter it?
 

naoki

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Looking forward to seeing yours!

The last time I grew these, I was treating them like Cypripedium. So I put the pot in the heated garage (around 40F), and watered lightly once a month or so. I haven't thought about it yet, but that is probably what I'll do.
 

naoki

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naoki

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Linus, you are right, it is Hosta sp. in Photos #1&2 in the second link. This blog post was about plants from Atera Gorge, Ookuwa-mura, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. I think it is high elevation area.

I don' think there is Epimedium sp. in the photos. The orchid after P. graminifolia is Epipactis thunbergii (#5). Tricyrtis latifolia (#6&7), Vaccinium japonica (#8), Mitchell undulate (#9), Melampyrum laxum var. arcuatum (#10), Platanthera tipuloides subsp. tipuloides var. sororia (#11, orchid), Astilbe thunbergii (#12), Hydrangea serrata (#13), Panicled hydrangea(#14).

I think the area will become pretty cold in the winter. Are you thinking of growing it in your garden? I haven't heard many people growing P. graminifolia in garden. They are small plants as Tom mentioned, so it might get overwhelmed by weeds easily.
 

Linus_Cello

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I don' think there is Epimedium sp. in the photos. The orchid after P. graminifolia is Epipactis thunbergii (#5). Tricyrtis latifolia (#6&7), Vaccinium japonica (#8), Mitchell undulate (#9), Melampyrum laxum var. arcuatum (#10), Platanthera tipuloides subsp. tipuloides var. sororia (#11, orchid), Astilbe thunbergii (#12), Hydrangea serrata (#13), Panicled hydrangea(#14).

Oops, your right. I meant Tricyrtis. I'd love to, but I'm guessing winters are too wet here and the ponerorchis would rot.
 

Steve G

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Ponerorchis graminifolia in flower here now.
34994598364_09e906a123_o_d.jpg
 
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