Plants From My Garden

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Critters' started by parvi_17, Apr 29, 2010.

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

  1. May 18, 2010 #41

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    A few more from today...

    Pulsatilla vulgaris subsp. grandis 'Papageno', a unique pasqueflower:

    [​IMG]

    Papaver nudicaule, Iceland poppy:

    [​IMG]

    And an updated pic of the Lewisia tweedyi:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. May 18, 2010 #42

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Here's a bonus from my coldframe:

    Coryphantha vivipara, pincushion cactus. This is a native of the southern part of Alberta. I am a strong believer that anyone who lives in a semi-arid climate, as I do, should grow native cacti. They're unique, beautiful, and easy to grow! I have another one of these growing in my garden (you can see it on the lower right in the latest Lewisia photo). This one is a lot bigger though, which is why I bought it. The one in the garden hasn't flowered for me yet.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. May 18, 2010 #43

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

    Peloric keiki

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Messages:
    9,374
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    elmer, nj
    cacti in canada?! learn something new every day! nice pictures!
     
  4. May 18, 2010 #44

    Kevin

    Kevin

    Kevin

    Guest

    Edmonton is semi-arid? I have tried cacti, but haven't got any to bloom. Haven't found the native ones for sale anywhere. To further your point, I believe that more people should use any native plants in their gardens. I like any native plants really, but especially the tall-grass prairie plants, since they are native to where I live. If grown in the right conditions, native plants usually require little maintenance and little water. No one waters or maintains them in the wild, so why in your yard? Cacti are great, and I would like to get more. Are there just two species native to Alberta, or more? What do you have yours planted in?
     
  5. May 18, 2010 #45

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Yes, I read somewhere that we are semi-arid. You can't really tell by the landscape; they base it on the amount of annual precip which is quite low. The summers here are incredibly hot and dry, so it certainly can feel like a desert! We don't have cacti up here though - they're down in the Drumheller area, where areas of the landscape look like Nevada. However, the native cacti do grow well here.

    I know of three native cactus species in Alberta. Besides this one, there is Opuntia polyacantha and O. fragilis. There may be more than that. I have all three of these in my garden; you can see my O. fragilis in some of the Lewisia photos (in the background).

    I agree that native plants, period, should be used in gardens more often. I have a number of them in my garden, and continue to expand my collection each year.
     
  6. May 18, 2010 #46

    smartie2000

    smartie2000

    smartie2000

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2006
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Iceland poppies are a good care free and continuously blooming perennial to have! I grew some from seed and they keep coming back. And nice sharp photo too
     
  7. May 18, 2010 #47

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    I agree! These have been in my garden since I was little (my mom and grandma planted them). They have persisted for all these years, though I remember having different colors years ago and they are now all orange. Because I'm not a big fan of poppies, I haven't bothered getting any more.
     
  8. May 25, 2010 #48

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Today is the first chance I've had in the past week or so to take more photos, as it's been cold and rainy.

    First off, Incarvillea delavayi, garden gloxinia. This is almost unheard of in my region, but it's a very cool plant. It's sitting outside of my coldframe waiting to be planted. As most websites list it as hardy to zone 5, I doubt it will survive here for long, but I'm gonna try! I don't have the space to store it over the winter because of my aroids, tender Cyps, Bletilla, Pleione, etc.

    [​IMG]

    Next up is a yellow cultivar of Iris pumila, dwarf bearded iris. I don't know what it's called, because I bought it at a flea market years ago and it was unlabeled. It's one of my favorite plants, and not just because of the pretty flowers. This started out maybe 5 years ago as a fairly small plant in a 6" pot. It spread into this giant clump very quickly and I've divided it twice since I planted it, and given pieces away. I now have a nice row of clumps at the front of one of my flower beds, and they all originated from that one plant. These reliably bloom in mid to late May, at least a week ahead of the standard bearded irises.

    [​IMG]

    Solomon's seal, Polygonatum commutatum, is another one of my favorite perennials. This particular plant I bought about 3 or 4 years ago at a garage sale, and it has now formed a nice clump. These are so aesthetically pleasing - I just cant get enough of those arching stems! That's my half-dead weeping juniper in the background :(.

    [​IMG]

    A yellow flower of Iceland poppy, Papaver nudicaule. I think I mentioned before that these have been in the garden since I was a toddler. They seem to be short-lived, but they self-seed so readily that they never disappear. However, the white flowered ones have been absent for many years.

    [​IMG]

    The classic pasqueflower, Pulsatilla vulgaris. Love that royal purple! The fluffy seedheads provide nice interest afterwards as well. Mine isn't as nice as some, I suspect because I have it in some shade.

    [​IMG]

    I LOVE peonies, and I especially love the species. This is Paeonia brownii. It has a lovely fragrance. It's a shorter plant, about 18" tall, and it forms a dense clump of dark green, finely cut leaves. Very nice plant for rock gardens. I might take another photo when it has multiple flowers open. The species peonies bloom a couple weeks earlier than the hybrids. This one will soon be followed by P. anomala, and possibly P. tenuifolia 'Plena', if the latter decides to bloom - the bud looks like it may be aborted. It's a new planting as of last year, and they take 2-3 years (or more) to settle in.

    Notice the ant on the anthers! Those guys sure love peonies too! People always tell me they don't want peonies because of the ants; to that I say "You're insane!".

    [​IMG]

    A really unique and uncommon thyme is juniper thyme, Thymus neiceffii. As the name suggests, the leaves look like juniper needles. Love the pink flowers and the aroma too.

    [​IMG]

    Lily-of-the-valley, Convallaria majalis, is one of the most overused garden plants, but I do like it. The flowers have a gorgeous fragrance, and this plant is very hard to kill. I planted a pink one somewhere...

    [​IMG]

    And now, for a special sneak preview of some of my earlier Cyps!

    Cyp. Emil (parviflorum x calceolus). This went from a single shoot in 2007 to five shoots and three flowers in 2008, to two shoots and one flower in 2009, to three shoots and two buds this year. Hoping for a full rebound next year!

    [​IMG]

    Cyp. Aki Pastel (macranthos x pubescens). This had a single shoot and no flower last year. This year it has 3 shoots and one bud. Can't wait to see what it looks like! I'm hoping for an almost pure white, like many of the pics on the Net.

    [​IMG]

    Cyp. Sebastian (parviflorum x montanum). This was a single shoot with one flower last year too. But it does seem to be tougher than montanum, and the flower looks a lot like x andrewsii. I still like montanum better though...

    [​IMG]

    That's all for now, folks!
     
  9. May 25, 2010 #49

    Leo Schordje

    Leo Schordje

    Leo Schordje

    wilted blossom

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    2,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NE Illinois
    Can't wait for the Cyps. THanks
     
  10. May 26, 2010 #50

    SlipperFan

    SlipperFan

    SlipperFan

    Addicted

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    Messages:
    43,289
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    I'm going to have to look for juniper thyme!

    About peonies, I've always heard that if your peonies don't have ants, they won't open. Anyone know if that's true?
     
  11. May 26, 2010 #51

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    I've never heard that before. I don't see how it could be true though... doesn't make much sense to me. Of course, I've never seen a peony without ants! :rollhappy:
     
  12. May 26, 2010 #52

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

    Just call me Tom

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    7,624
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Kyushu, Japan; warm temperate/subtropical climate
    Indeed, please don't forget to post shots of the Cyps in flower!
     
  13. May 30, 2010 #53
    I *think* I know where this belief originated. If a bud fails to develop for some reason (be it frost, fungal or other disease, insufficient moisture or humidity, or something else), then there won't be any of the sweet exudate, so typical of peony flowers, produced and therefore such a bud won't attract ants. So, I think the belief is back asswards--peonies that fail to bloom don't attract the ants!
     
  14. May 30, 2010 #54

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Makes sense to me!
     
  15. May 31, 2010 #55

    SlipperFan

    SlipperFan

    SlipperFan

    Addicted

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    Messages:
    43,289
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Me, too. Is it possible that the ants, by eating the sweet sticky stuff, help open the flowers?
     
  16. May 31, 2010 #56

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Update

    I'd like to correct myself first off - the peony I posted before is actually P. broteroi, not P. brownii.

    If you've read Yoyo_Jo's thread "It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas", you know that Alberta recently had a bit of snow. Well that's melted now (we only got a little here, maybe 1cm at my place), and it's slowly warming up again. I have a couple more photos from the garden today...

    Another variety of dwarf bearded iris (I. pumila), this one is a really gorgeous, powder blue color. The photo turned out slightly more violet than the true color. In person it's absolutely stunning, and I've never seen another dwarf bearded iris with this color. I paid through the nose for this one (like $25 or something, twice or more what I'd normally pay), and it was worth it! Unfortunately I don't know the name of it - it had no tag. This was a find at a little family operated greenhouse in the middle of nowhere last year, where there was not much of a selection but a few gems hidden here and there. Sometimes you can find the nicest stuff in the most unexpected places!

    [​IMG]

    I had to throw in a pic of my lilac bush (Syringa vulgaris). A classic shrub with a classic fragrance. These are probably long finished blooming in most areas of the States and Europe.

    [​IMG]

    Iris pseudacorus, yellow flag, is a North American species of iris that grows in bogs. This whitish cream cultivar, 'Alba', is something I had never seen before. I picked it up at work last week.

    [​IMG]

    In the coldframe, Dodecatheon dentatum, dentate shooting star, is blooming. This uncommon species is one of my favorites. It's already almost done blooming; it took me forever to get in there and photograph it. My other shooting stars in the garden are just starting to bloom.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. May 31, 2010 #57

    Lanmark

    Lanmark

    Lanmark

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    0
    I love irises. They were my grandmother's favorite. She had massive quantities of them.
     
  18. May 31, 2010 #58

    jewel

    jewel

    jewel

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2010
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    0
    does the purple iris smell of grapes?
     
  19. May 31, 2010 #59

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    parvi_17

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    No - it has the same faint smell that I've detected on all my irises, which is hard to desribe but is unique to irises.
     
  20. May 31, 2010 #60

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

    Just call me Tom

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    7,624
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Kyushu, Japan; warm temperate/subtropical climate
    Snow in May just ain't my bag...so enjoy! Love the shooting star. Here in southern Japan you don't see many lilacs, but one neighbor has a tree - it finished flowering about 6 weeks ago :rollhappy:
     

Share This Page

arrow_white