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Phrag. caudanum

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abax

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I'd appreciate input about the specific culture of this Phrag. from anyone who has been successful growing and blooming it. I've read various culture sites
and my culture seems right, but with two large growths it hasn't shown any signs of blooming. I also have a seedling Caudanum x sanderiae if I'm reading
the very faded label correctly and it appears to not be doing well.
 

Tom-DE

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I am assuming you are asking about culture on Phrag. caudatum. If not, just ignore what I am going to say...

I grew and bloomed mine(warscrewicianum) but I lost it to bacterial rot soon after that... The petal on mine is almost 30" long and the plant was compact. Although mine was labeled as Phrag. warscrewicianum...I believe it was a syn. of caudatum.
Here is my suggestion for Phrag. caudatum--definitely grow it with good air movement in the gh, medium light(more light than normal Paph or Phrag but less than Catt.), slightly dry it out between waterings, cool it off a bit in the fall or early winter.
 

abax

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I don't know either Eric. Perhaps I'm reading it incorrectly. Tom, that's exactly the description of the conditions the
plant has been growing for some time...over two years, at least. I'm going to dump the seedling.
 

rodtay477

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Hi I have grown this phrag for years, but not always successfully I have flowered it a few times and have found it flowers best when give high winter light,
I tried growing it in rockwool but it hated it so it is in a bark perlite mix, and is growing heathy roots, to get more light I lift the pot and place it on top of another, let it dry out a bit between waterings.
Best wishes.
 

monocotman

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Angela, have you asked the Fischer’s? They grow excellent long petalled Phrags,
David.
 

KateL

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A moot point if you are going to dump it, but I suspect the label once said Phrag. caudatum v. sanderae.
 

richgarrison

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I'd appreciate input about the specific culture of this Phrag. from anyone who has been successful growing and blooming it. I've read various culture sites
and my culture seems right, but with two large growths it hasn't shown any signs of blooming. I also have a seedling Caudanum x sanderiae if I'm reading
the very faded label correctly and it appears to not be doing well.
have you seen the end of year issue of orchid digest last year? It was a phrag special issue with cultural info (in situ and greenhouse) about each species... Short of finding someone that is successfully growing these, that may help.

I'm watching this thread with anticipation as i also have examples of this plant, and would love to see growing advice from successful growers.
 

tomkalina

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Phrag. caudatum is not the easiest Phrag. species to grow well for us either. Not sure why, but It's the reason we grow Phrag. humboldtii instead; they seem to be easier.
 

Djthomp28

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I have a large one that finally spiked only to blast 3 weeks into development. On the other hand I have a seedling from Windy Hill that is a single growth seedling that is spiking. I wish I knew why one seems so hesitate and the other bloomed early. Breeding and good genes I guess. I grow both as Tom described just a little less light on the seedling.
 

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KateL

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I have a large one that finally spiked only to blast 3 weeks into development. On the other hand I have a seedling from Windy Hill that is a single growth seedling that is spiking. I wish I knew why one seems so hesitate and the other bloomed early. Breeding and good genes I guess. I grow both as Tom described just a little less light on the seedling.
Look at all those blooms!!! Woohoo!
 

Duck Slipper

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I don't know either Eric. Perhaps I'm reading it incorrectly. Tom, that's exactly the description of the conditions the
plant has been growing for some time...over two years, at least. I'm going to dump the seedling.
Don’t dump your seedling till after this bloom season. Years ago I learned that if my caudatums aren’t blooming. Nights aren’t cool enough and/or light isn’t bright enough. So, with that said,a south facing window and turning down the thermostat at night, my caudatums bloom! Is it the particular geez I have....maybe, I do not know. But, I have other (slippers)paphs. that are certainly more difficult to grow. I have never bloomed a caudatum any other time of year than the few months that are now coming up! Duck
 

abax

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Kate I suspect you're right about the seedling label. I have no idea where the plant even came from...perhaps as a
freebie with an order. Duck, the plants are right inside the south wall of my greenhouse and also LED grow lights,
night temps. about 55F, humidity 80%-90% and both ceiling fans and area fans 24/7. Day temps. might reach up to
70F on a sunny day. I have no idea what I can do to improve the growing conditions.

Rich, I've read every available source on caudanum culture to no avail so far. I did see either a new leaf or maybe the
beginning of a spike this morning on the large three growth plant. Perhaps there is hope.
 

Tom-DE

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Send it to me. :)
Wait on line, Eric.
Angela, if you send them to me. I might keep calling them "caudanum" too :confused: Serious though, I would like to have one through trade. Anyone would bite the bait?
 

awesomei

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Hello,
I have grown and bloomed many long petal Phrags., including several varieties of caudatums. I grow mine on the south side of my greenhouse, with good light, relative humidity between 70 and 80 percent, night temps 55 to 60, very strong air circulation and water once every 7 to 10 days with rainwater_DSC5718 Phrag. caudatum 24 inch petals.jpg. They usually start spiking about now through April. I have had several produce flowers with 28 to 32 inch petals.

George
 

abax

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Mr. Begard, that is one magnificent plant! You're my new hero! My conditions are very similar to your culture, but I water
more often like every four to five days in winter. Perhaps that's too much. Mine is potted in an 8" slotted clay pot, Orchiata,
coarse perlite and charcoal and gets lots of air movement. Any suggestions? Oh, fertilizer K-Lite weakly with every
watering.

You ain't scammed Eric. The seedling is tiny and unlikely to survive shipping.
 

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