parviflorum in the mountains

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GuRu

experienced greenhorn
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Beautiful to see them growing in their natural habitat. 👌 So far I've seen C. parviflorum solely in flower pots or gardens namely in an artificial surroundings.
 

My Green Pets

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My phone had 0 signal where we were. I couldn't have recorded location data even if i had wanted to 😆

The holy grail to me would be Cyp kentuckiense.

Fantastic! And to Angela's point, remembering to cull out the EXIF data on your photos before submitting them protects your information as well as the location (which you did).
 

KyushuCalanthe

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Your plants would fall into the concept of pubescens, at least to my eyes. That said, the delineation of this species into the more or less accepted varieties, v. parviflorum, v. pubescens, and v. makasin, are based largely on plants from populations east of the Mississippi River. Plants in the western US and far north don't always fall into those categories easily, and indeed even many eastern plants seem to be intermediate forms.

If you want to see kentuckiense I'd contact someone who knows a population and is willing to take you to it. They are rare as hen's teeth, even in the heart of the species' distribution in and around the state of Arkansas. I've only seen cultivated plants, but they are something to see in person.
 

abax

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I know where some kentuckiense are growing, but it's hell getting to the area and the
place is well protected.
 

cnycharles

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Charles are these kentuckiense that you saw and photographed? I'm guessing you were not in new jersey!
Yes, and no. …Tom is correct! :D
Tom, there were a few that were mostly yellow, but most of them had a green background tint to them. If they look greenish in the pic, they were green tinted in life

Zach is the caretaker of the state where these are, would need to contact him about location access. I think his last name is Bradford but can’t remember. It’s far from Colorado though
 

KyushuCalanthe

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Tom, there were a few that were mostly yellow, but most of them had a green background tint to them. If they look greenish in the pic, they were green tinted in life
Thanks. If memory serves, this population was found to have alleles that are also present in C. parviflorum, suggesting there was introgression between the 2 species at some point. Given that gene viability is low in this species, it is unique to have this extra variation, something western populations lack. I wonder if the plants at the Georgia site have the same variation, or if that is unique to this population. Certainly this species was once more abundant across its range in the distant past given the current disjunctive populations that exist today.

BTW, I looked at your Isotria medeoloides and Platanthera peramoena videos today. Nice to see both thriving. I was a bit surprised to see double flowers on the Isotria - I'm guessing this must be a fairly common thing since I've seen more than one photo of plants with double flowers. Of the hundreds of I. verticillata I've seen, a can't remember seeing one with double flowers, but then again my memory ain't what it used to be!
 
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