Paphiopedilum tigrinum

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

GuRu

experienced greenhorn
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
4,115
Reaction score
480
Location
GERMANY
Hi Uri,

The flower of your P. tigrinum is really beautiful - good in colour, shape and stance and your photo is excellent, too.
Both well done, congrats.

Best regards from Germany, GuRu
 

WolfDog1 (C. Williams)

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Messages
831
Reaction score
0
Location
Tigard OR
I've killed 2.
I am so jealous!
One of the members of my society had one at our meeting
last month....it was very nice. I think all tigrinums (sp?)
are nice.

(pouting)

Craig
 

Roy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
3,260
Reaction score
1
Location
Halls Gap,Western Victoria, Australia
Hi Roy,

I have been asking around for this one for a while and none of the importers or growers know of it being available anywhere. If I find any I'll let you know but apparently it's still hard to import anyway.

Fingers crossed it makes an appearance.
You are right, finding a tigrinum here as very difficult and I think the reason is that the plants don't survive. As Eric M explained, the plants are being grown incorrectly. I spoke with an importer of orchids recently and he said he had lost all plants, damped off. Knowing his culture and house, no wonder. Exactly the opposite to what Eric said.
Lets keep loking for each other.
Roy.
 

NYEric

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
48,694
Reaction score
442
Location
New York City Apartment
I have to google up tigrinum to see why there's such a fuss about this. Is it new? Where does it come from? Are we going to get Vietnam to make illegal Paphs legal in exchange for trade agreements?
 

Rick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
12,765
Reaction score
3
Location
Leiper's Fork, TN
I have to google up tigrinum to see why there's such a fuss about this. Is it new? Where does it come from? Are we going to get Vietnam to make illegal Paphs legal in exchange for trade agreements?
It hasn't been reported from Vietnam as far as I know, and it was discovered fairly recently (1990). It comes from a restricted and remote mountainous area in Southern China. Its range should overlap with hirsutisimum. The elevation is pretty high, and it may get some warmish summer temps, but otherwise it stays coolish most of the year. I think the summer is its big monsoon time of year.

Its been found both terrestrially and epiphytically. The geology in the area is old volcanic so its not a high pH plant by any means.

Given the relatively recent discovery seedlings didn't become very easy to find untill about 2000, and divisions were going for some pretty big $$. It seems like the 1st generation plants are starting to realy come in to there own now.
 
E

Eric Muehlbauer

Guest
While tigrinum was written up and identified after the 1990 CITES ban, it had already arrived in the US (and other countries) in various importations. All tigrinums (that I know of) on the market, at least in the US, are legally propagated descendents of those original plants. However, since there wasn't a huge population in the first place, there are not that many descendants...also, since, partly for that reason, they were never cheap, they didn't really work their way into greater popularity. Too bad...as a vigorous and fast grower, tigrinum has the potential to be more popular and widespread. Take care, Eric
 
P

paphjoint

Guest
A second population was found in Myanmar - and an article was published last year in The Orchid review - If anybody wants more info ask -I'll try to dig up the issue



It hasn't been reported from Vietnam as far as I know, and it was discovered fairly recently (1990). It comes from a restricted and remote mountainous area in Southern China. Its range should overlap with hirsutisimum. The elevation is pretty high, and it may get some warmish summer temps, but otherwise it stays coolish most of the year. I think the summer is its big monsoon time of year.

Its been found both terrestrially and epiphytically. The geology in the area is old volcanic so its not a high pH plant by any means.

Given the relatively recent discovery seedlings didn't become very easy to find untill about 2000, and divisions were going for some pretty big $$. It seems like the 1st generation plants are starting to realy come in to there own now.
 

Rick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
12,765
Reaction score
3
Location
Leiper's Fork, TN
A second population was found in Myanmar - and an article was published last year in The Orchid review - If anybody wants more info ask -I'll try to dig up the issue
Please do so Uri. That sounds like hundreds of miles away from the Chinese site.

This split is kind of like the gratrixianum find.
 
P

paphjoint

Guest
Ok here it is :
Paphiopedilum tigrinum in Myanmar by Kyaw Nyunt Orchid Review March-April 2006 vol 114 No1268.

A description of a newly discovered area where P. tigrinum colonies can be found. The area is situated in the northernmost part of Myanmar the area is around 1200-1800 m above sea level -
P; tigrinum is found growing on trees ( Castanopsis indica) -next to Coelogyne fimbriata.
That's it !!
 

Jon in SW Ohio

Reefer, the legal kind
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
998
Reaction score
0
Location
Springboro, Ohio
Been super busy lately, but here's a quick pic of mine currently in bloom with another bud on the way. Look familiar Heather? :poke: I'll get some good pics with the better camera soon.



Jon
 
Top