Paphiopedilum parishii culture advice

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Paphman910

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And if you overwater it, it will die very easily (because it has so little root to begin with).
Not true and it depends on your conditions!

One of our local member had lots of plants in his greenhouse and they would have very little roots. Even some of our local members complained about it. So I decided to examine his watering practises. He use a sprayer to just enough water so there is barely any water dripping from the drainage holes. He does the same with fertilizer water as well. He has been doing that for years and has great looking Paphiopedilums! Growths are big and looks healthy but when you unpot it ..... only 2 to 3 roots. His greenhouse has high humidity and lots of air movement.
 

Happypaphy7

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Me too as well since I grow indoor as well!

I had one many years ago and it had long, thick stiff leaves and very little roots. I gave it to my friend who grew it in his greenhouse and after a few years later he bloomed it with 9 flowers.

I do agree that hybrids are alot easier to grow! I found that parishii and randsii doesn't produce alot of roots.
But the few roots part you mention is most likely not the representative of the species because this species is mostly found rather high up (well above the ground level) on trees. You'd think such an epiphytic plant would produce lots of roots to secure itself on the tree surface.
My lowii, a species also found as an epiphyte (although not exclusively as one), grows lots of roots. But then, I find multi-floral paphs are in general the root champions.
 

LO69

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But the few roots part you mention is most likely not the representative of the species because this species is mostly found rather high up (well above the ground level) on trees. You'd think such an epiphytic plant would produce lots of roots to secure itself on the tree surface.
My lowii, a species also found as an epiphyte (although not exclusively as one), grows lots of roots. But then, I find multi-floral paphs are in general the root champions.
Good observations!
I just think the more you water a plant the less developped its root system is.
But my experience Is limited to organic medium I know nothing about S/I or other cultural methods.
 

Happypaphy7

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Good observations!
I just think the more you water a plant the less developped its root system is.
But my experience Is limited to organic medium I know nothing about S/I or other cultural methods.
It might seem logical but true, at least not for orchids in my opinion.
I have seen these comparison photos where plants that grow their roots in the soil are grown in two different conditions. One with frequent watering and one on the slightly drier side. The one grown with more frequent watering indeed had much less developed root system.
Here is the problem. I'm not sure if the less developed root system is due to ample water available at all time and thus the plant decides to spend less energy invested on growing a larger root system, or is it because lack of available air that harm the proper root growth?
I raise this question because I have seen how the Dutch farmers grow plants (conventional soil crops like tomatoes and lots of other garden crops). All the roots are in water but massive root system!! They do pump lots of oxygen in the water for the plants and I wonder that is why?
The larger the root system (even under ample water availability), the more water and nutrient a plant can uptake and use towards growing bigger. So, this seems like a logical thing at first, but the more think about it, the more problem there is with this line of reasoning.

By the way, the Dutch still grow their orhids like Phalaenopsis in bark mix. I don't think that's necessarily because they can't grow them in water, but they have to sell them as potted flowering plant. It's much easier to transport and such.
The ones grown in water are usually edibles like berries and leafy vegetables and flowers harvested for cut flower trade where they don't have to transport the entire plant.
 

LO69

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It might seem logical but true, at least not for orchids in my opinion.
I have seen these comparison photos where plants that grow their roots in the soil are grown in two different conditions. One with frequent watering and one on the slightly drier side. The one grown with more frequent watering indeed had much less developed root system.
Here is the problem. I'm not sure if the less developed root system is due to ample water available at all time and thus the plant decides to spend less energy invested on growing a larger root system, or is it because lack of available air that harm the proper root growth?
I raise this question because I have seen how the Dutch farmers grow plants (conventional soil crops like tomatoes and lots of other garden crops). All the roots are in water but massive root system!! They do pump lots of oxygen in the water for the plants and I wonder that is why?
The larger the root system (even under ample water availability), the more water and nutrient a plant can uptake and use towards growing bigger. So, this seems like a logical thing at first, but the more think about it, the more problem there is with this line of reasoning.

By the way, the Dutch still grow their orhids like Phalaenopsis in bark mix. I don't think that's necessarily because they can't grow them in water, but they have to sell them as potted flowering plant. It's much easier to transport and such.
The ones grown in water are usually edibles like berries and leafy vegetables and flowers harvested for cut flower trade where they don't have to transport the entire plant.
Well if I try to think like an orchid I guess that when ample supply of water and nutrients are close to me why should I spend energy to grow an abundant and extensive root system? The opposite Is also true, if the medium Is on the dry side I must go in search for water and I need to extend and go deeper in search for umidity and nutrients.
A costantly wet medium has also less oxigen at the bottom layer so the roots probably want to stay in the upper part of the pot.
When we repot our orchids don't we keep them quite dry for 15/20 days to stimulate new roots production?

A good thing for those who like to water a lot Is to oxigenate the water with a small pump and an airstone ( Aquarium type). Roots love oxigen!!! Rain Is full of O2
I experienced both ways but I definitely prefer to keep them on the dry side!
 
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Well if I try to think like an orchid I guess that when ample supply of water and nutrients are close to me why should I spend energy to grow an abundant and extensive root system? The opposite Is also true, if the medium Is on the dry side I must go in search for water and I need to extend and go deeper in search for umidity and nutrients.
A costantly wet medium has also less oxigen at the bottom layer so the roots probably want to stay in the upper part of the pot.
When we repot our orchids don't we keep them quite dry for 15/20 days to stimulate new roots production?

A good thing for those who like to water a lot Is to oxigenate the water with a small pump and an airstone ( Aquarium type). Roots love oxigen!!! Rain Is full of O2
I experienced both ways but I definitely prefer to keep them on the dry side!
I think we keep them dry so as to minimize impact of root injury?

curious about the air pump. How would one accomplish this? I mix my RO/K-Lite water in gallon jugs; if I stick an aerating tube in, doesn’t the oxygen just bubble right now instantly? Is there a practical method? Thanks.
 

LO69

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I think we keep them dry so as to minimize impact of root injury?

curious about the air pump. How would one accomplish this? I mix my RO/K-Lite water in gallon jugs; if I stick an aerating tube in, doesn’t the oxygen just bubble right now instantly? Is there a practical method? Thanks.
I had seen this method at a paph nursery in Germany. The owner was a skilled grower. He built a 1 Meter cube concrete(1000 lt./250 gal) tank into his GH and just dip the air stone inside the tank keeping It constantly bubble into the water. He also warmed the water up with an Aquarium heater. In Winter time It Is not good to apply cold water.

You can find a container just bigger than a gal with only water and put your air stone inside. If you don't want to let It on 24/7 Just connect a timer that switch the pump on several hours before watering Is needed. It takes some time to oxigenate well the water. Take this O2 water and make your fertilizer solution.
 

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