Paphiopedilum ooii and Paphiopedilum xkimballianum

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Roth

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Regardless, kimballianum looks great! Would like to get one.. :D

Yes, I know how difficult it is to establish jungle-collected plants. I have seen plants in worse condition which are actually put for sale at orchid shows..
The worst when people sell and buy jungle plants is that most people, including the commercial growers, do not have access to fungicides and bactericides to save such plants, so they die slowly...
 

Roth

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Finally one of your ooii flowering...hope to see more than 2-3 flowers.
Apparently 2-3, sure not more... So far it just confirms that ooii is more similar to stonei and praestans than the superhugefantastic species it was supposed to be.

I have only 1 plant that might have a lot of flowers on its spike, but have to wait some more months to a year for that one...
 

SlipperKing

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Most interesting Sanderianum! I'm very pleased to see the beginings of some sucess. If it does bloom, I image you will not set seed on it and try to grow it up stronger before selfing it or a F2 cross if you have another source for pollen. Am I right?
 

Roth

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Most interesting Sanderianum! I'm very pleased to see the beginings of some sucess. If it does bloom, I image you will not set seed on it and try to grow it up stronger before selfing it or a F2 cross if you have another source for pollen. Am I right?
I am afraid it is as strong as that plant can be, it's already well rooted to say the least, so I am in for 2-3 flowers on that. I wait for the others to decide to do something. Actually I want to use parents with a bit more flowers. On the other side, I am always curious to see a cultivated ooii in bloom, that's not that common, and will make nice photos. On internet, the msot recent ones are still couple of years old...
 

SlipperKing

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You have it in the Orchidiata bark?.....How's your sanderianums coming along? Are they open yet? I'd like to see the HS Select X Brears Select clones you have. Mine looks like it might be dark colored but you never know until it opens.
 

Roth

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You have it in the Orchidiata bark?.....How's your sanderianums coming along? Are they open yet? I'd like to see the HS Select X Brears Select clones you have. Mine looks like it might be dark colored but you never know until it opens.
Yes, power+ grade pure... and they root like crazy. sands are in Power or Power+ depending on my mood.

My sands started to open a couple days ago, I wait until the petals expand completely. HS x Bear apparently has a smaller flower than my others, but dark too...
 

SlipperKing

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Here's my HS Select X Bears Select a couple of weeks ago. Is yours about the color as my buds are?

I have it in Power (5) but with spongerock and charcoal. Same as before but with crappy bark before
 

Roth

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Here's my HS Select X Bears Select a couple of weeks ago. Is yours about the color as my buds are?

I have it in Power (5) but with spongerock and charcoal. Same as before but with crappy bark before
Yes, more or less the same color. The flowers start to open, and the petals seems to be quite wide...

I tried the mix of Power and additives but nowadays, when I want to get it more aerated, I just use the Power+. Makes the things less complicated.

About the color of sands - not about yours-, there is one thing, if they dry out a little bit, the color is darker.

That's why many times the jungle fresh sands have extremely dark small flowers, because their roots are gone, they automatically flower when they are shocked, and there is not enough water supply.
 

paphioboy

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Michael Ooi recently claimed (on Facebook) that he has a plant of ooii about to flower in his mountain garden, along with 200 plants of rothschildianum and 200 plants of sanderianum. And I quote him, " ex-situ (conservation) is now recognised as a better alternative then in-situ; as many locals are collecting these plants as they are there for the "collecting" and many are even selling them knowing very well that paphiopedilum needs a certain requirements to be able to grow and flower them." Thoughts?
 

emydura

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It makes no sense to me. Once a species is no longer in the wild, breeding and evolving, it is as good as extinct. People may even grow them well but evenually the plants will die. The breeding of Paphs (& other orchids) is based around selection for traits we like, not for survival in the wild. After a few generations it is quite likely the Paphs we grow would no longer to be able to survive in the wild.

Fashions come and go. Growing Paph species might be popular now. But who is to say in a 100 years or a 1000 years that it will be still be popular.

While ever a species is totally dependent on humans for survival, that species has no long term future. I don't see any link between growing species in my glasshouse and their conservation.

The best form of conservation is to preserve them in their natural habitat.

David
 

SlipperKing

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Wow that is quite a statement David! As much as I don't want to admit your point is true. It just kills me to think I'm NOT the super grower I thought I was!
 

SlipperFan

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Very sobering thoughts. And when you think about how natural habitats are being cleared to make way for human habitation.....
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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In principle, I would agree. Except that as habitats are destroyed, plants are lost. Ex situ preservation is essential if we are to keep the species in existence. What has to be done is breeding for preservation, not awards. Fine, select your best and easiest roths for the trade, but at the same time, cross as many representatives of the species as possible, regardless of beauty or ease of culture. Unfortunately, only universities and botanical gardens can do that. I remember years back, post CITES, when Ray Rands had to start selling seed propagated plants, he claimed that his plants were crossed not for awards or beauty, but for their attributes as typical members of their species, with a full range of adaptability.
 

Ozpaph

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It makes no sense to me. Once a species is no longer in the wild, breeding and evolving, it is as good as extinct. People may even grow them well but evenually the plants will die. The breeding of Paphs (& other orchids) is based around selection for traits we like, not for survival in the wild. After a few generations it is quite likely the Paphs we grow would no longer to be able to survive in the wild.

Fashions come and go. Growing Paph species might be popular now. But who is to say in a 100 years or a 1000 years that it will be still be popular.

While ever a species is totally dependent on humans for survival, that species has no long term future. I don't see any link between growing species in my glasshouse and their conservation.

The best form of conservation is to preserve them in their natural habitat.

David
Bravo!!!
 

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