Paphiopedilum armeniacum basket culture success story

Discussion in 'Paphiopedilum' started by JPMC, Oct 29, 2010.

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  1. Oct 30, 2010 #21

    emydura

    emydura

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    Very impressive. Both the flower and the culture.

    David
     
  2. Oct 30, 2010 #22

    chrismende

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    Incidentally, I recently bought a multigrowth Vanda Pearman that has long runners, too! Perhaps I'll try that one!
     
  3. Oct 30, 2010 #23

    John M

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    Do you mean Paph. Vanda M. Pearman? That's bellatulum x delenatii. Neither of those species produce runners (stolons). So, I'd think that if you've got runners, it's likely mislabelled.
     
  4. Oct 31, 2010 #24
    What temps do you give it in winter? I would think watering it, even every other day during a 'chilling' period,
    would result in rot death. :confused:
     
  5. Oct 31, 2010 #25

    Shiva

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    Good way to grow that one. Evidence is conclusive.
     
  6. Oct 31, 2010 #26

    JPMC

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    ~75F during the day and ~60F at night for the winter.

    I will say that I can only keep the humidity at 50-70% so that may account for the need for water.

    In the summer the day temps. are ~85-90F and ~70-75F at night. It really soaks up the water in the summer.

    The basket keeps the air circulation pretty good at the roots all year long.
     
  7. Nov 1, 2010 #27
    ... so the lowest temps this plant gets is 60? and it blooms? Most of us are trying to hard!
     
  8. Nov 1, 2010 #28

    JPMC

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    Are you shocked at how cold or warm I let it get?
     
  9. Nov 1, 2010 #29
    Surprised is more like it. One would think with natural habitat being in the low 40's in winter, that there needs to be a 'chilling' period. My winter nighttime low in my GH is 55, daytime minimum 70, if what works for you will work for me (crossed fingers) it really wouldn't need any special treatment!
     
  10. Nov 1, 2010 #30

    JPMC

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    I see. It's probably the most rapidly growing paph. I have. The only things it wants are the temps. I mentioned above plus lots of fertilizer ("weakly weekly" with 125-150 ppm of a urea-free fertilizer) and 1/2 day of sun. In every way similar to a cattleya except that it wants more water.
     
  11. Nov 1, 2010 #31

    dodidoki

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    Very interesting... I had two armeniacs, I killed both in very short time....they were grown as a "regular" paph: shady, with more humidity as the usual e.g. with catts. I will try it another way in future, as you mentioned....I read a very interesting article about species: in China, where it grows, many farmer feed their pigs with paph. armeniacums. Pigs love its fat, tasty leaves...brrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  12. Nov 2, 2010 #32
    I would think that the constant evaporation would cool the plant. That said, the only time I ever got an armeniacum to bloom, was after a very warm summer and fall...so warm that no complex paphs bloomed. This was on a collected plant that I had for at least 12 years prior to bloom. Of course it died the next season.
     
  13. Nov 14, 2015 #33

    spujr

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    I was just wondering if anyone had any more updates on their experience with this? Curious to know how often they get repotted?

    I recently transferred my armencian and micranthrum to one, moss on the outside about 2 inches thick with standard paph bark mix in the middle. I removed the coconut fiber that came with the basket.

    The micranthrum is holding out ok so far. I think I need to water a little more since my GH conditions are similar in temps and humidity as the poster with success.
    Here's a picture shortly after transplanting: [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
     
  14. Nov 14, 2015 #34

    Justin

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    yes you should water these plants heavily.
     
  15. Nov 14, 2015 #35

    spujr

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    Also forgot to ask, if there is a particular time of year when you see the most active growth?
     
  16. Nov 14, 2015 #36

    Happypaphy7

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    Yes, with this set up, you will have to water a lot.
    Good luck!

    Both species grow during the spring & summer in the wild as winter gets too cool.
    Under cultivation, they may grow whenever unless cold winter is given.
     
  17. Nov 14, 2015 #37

    Bob in Albany N.Y.

    Bob in Albany  N.Y.

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    spujr, I wish you luck with this. I tried it not with a basket like that but rather one of those black net baskets that had small openings. I first let it hang and I felt it was doing well, and then it started going backwards and now has gone from 5 or 6 growths to one and a start. I did move it and put it under some vandas so now it gets misted every day but only watered when I water the whole greenhouse. It seems to be holding it's own but not progressing. I'll sacrifice this plant and just let it go. Maybe it just needs time, however it has been in the basket for a year now. Only change is now I don't water it so much as it gets misted.
     
  18. Nov 14, 2015 #38

    Happypaphy7

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    It might be suffering from underwatering?
    I'm not sure how heavy your misting is not the frequency of watering your greenhouse, but misting might not be enough especially in the warmest months in such an open set up?
     
  19. Nov 14, 2015 #39

    Ozpaph

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    my plastic net basket parvis are doing really well - I think, wet, wet, wet is the answer.
     
  20. Nov 15, 2015 #40

    spujr

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    Yes, I noticed with my misting system the basket gets dry quickly so the water is not soaking all the way through. Thus, I placed the basket under one of the mister nozzels that drips water for an hour after I turn off the mister. It seems the basket is holding better water now.

    I'm a bit cautious about watering these plants (or any plants too heavily). I've lost too many due to rot. In fact, I lost my previous armeniacum this way but looking back I believe it was due to not changing the medium earlier. With the extra water, I'd imagine the media will break down sooner than normal and one would need to keep an eye on it....
     

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