Paph glaucophyllum

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Rick

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This plant has been rebuilding itself for the last couple years so glad to have a new spike going on it. Bred it with Rick's plant last time it was in bloom and raising some seedlings from the cross too.

 

Happypaphy7

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Isn't white halo distinctive feature of liemianum??
Looking at this picture, I thought it was a hybrid of liemianum and chamberlainianum.
 

Rick

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Isn't white halo distinctive feature of liemianum??
Looking at this picture, I thought it was a hybrid of liemianum and chamberlainianum.
The foliage is more distinctive characteristic than the (variable) white halo. Glaucous as in dull grayish or powdery dusted which this plant is very type specific. I also think I have pics of flowers from this plant with no halo too:confused:

Leimianum on the other hand has purple striping under the dark shiny leaves. The halo in liemianum is also highly variable to non existent.:confused:
 

abax

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Very, VERY nice one. Mine just opened it's first bloom too.
Mine always seems to bloom, take a short rest and then
bloom again with several flowers over a period of months.
I like that.
 

Happypaphy7

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The foliage is more distinctive characteristic than the (variable) white halo. Glaucous as in dull grayish or powdery dusted which this plant is very type specific. I also think I have pics of flowers from this plant with no halo too:confused:

Leimianum on the other hand has purple striping under the dark shiny leaves. The halo in liemianum is also highly variable to non existent.:confused:
This group is messy that way. and I don't see the point of making hybrids within this group because it makes the matter even worse. :confused:

Glaucophyllum is the one I have hard time to tell apart from others in the group. Moquettianum, chamberlainianum, Victoria-mariae, liemianum all seem quite distinctive to me.
 

Rick

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This group is messy that way. and I don't see the point of making hybrids within this group because it makes the matter even worse. :confused:

Glaucophyllum is the one I have hard time to tell apart from others in the group. Moquettianum, chamberlainianum, victoria-mariae, liemianum all seem quite distinctive to me.
I agree totally.

The first 3 species described were glaucophyllum, chamberlainianum (victoria-reginia), and victoria mariae (all in the1890's), and foliar and geographic differences where probably more important as descriptors than floral differences.

I think primulinum really stands out from all of them (especially the yellow version) because it is so small in comparison to the others. And victoria-mariae seems to really stand out on the rare occasions you ever actually come across it. But if you don't have entire plants in hand it definitely can be a guessing game to sort these guys out.
 

Lance Birk

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This group of species is to be forever mis-identified unless and until you are looking at a clone known to have positively come directly from the jungle habitat and not just from the habitat country.

Additionally you must observe both the flower as well as it's plant to make a correct judgement.

Current line-breeding efforts ensure this outcome for any orchid 'species.'
 

Rick

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Adding some foliage pics.

I agree with Lance for the concept of being 100% sure. But unless you're loaded ($$) with the time and resources to collect your own plants, you're probably going to have to be satisfied with 75% certainty by appearances. Maybe DNA will become a cheap way to differentiate in the future. It settles paternity suites:wink:





Left to right: glaucophyllum, leimianum, primulinum var. purperescens, primulinum (nominal yellow).


Closeup of the glauc and liemianum (a moquetianum would maybe be bigger than glauc and have some purple diffusion at the base of the plant.


Still didn't get a good shot of all the purple on the base of the purperescens, but in this plant it sometimes "bleeds"pigment to the upper surfaces of the leaves and you see some purple chevrons on the surface of some of the leaves. The purple is from purple spots that get close enough to be solid at the base of the plant. In moquetianum the purple is just a blush.
 

abax

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Thank you for the comparison shots Rick. Mine was mislabeled and I've been a tad confused for quite a while.
I can see from your photos that mine is definitely glauc, not
moq as originally tagged.
 

Rick

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Thank you for the comparison shots Rick. Mine was mislabeled and I've been a tad confused for quite a while.
I can see from your photos that mine is definitely glauc, not
moq as originally tagged.
The split between glauc and moquett is probably one of the hardest to make. Some taxonomy still puts moquet as a variety of glaucophyllum and then chromosome analysis separated it to species status (since it has an extra chromosome compared to glauc).

The foliage is very close (usually there's some purple blush to moquett).

This is one of those species that in my mind you go out of your way to find it in bloom and get the one which in your opinion is the most typical of what was used for the type description because there is a lot of overlap in the natural variation and you want to find a flower with the most extreme difference from the similar species.

So for moquet you want to find a flower with a dorsal sepal that has a clear yellow background and discreet spots that almost don't seem to be in rows.
 

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