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Paph. Constant Great 'Big Gun'

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Jason Fischer

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Here's my first post using my new camera, which is a Nikon D100 digital SLR with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens. I'm still learning how to use this thing, and I need to get a macro lens for better close ups. It's funny how the cybershot with the Carl Zeiss macro lens that I always use for the website and for the forums seems to take the best shots, even though it costs a 5th of what these digital SLR's do!

Constant Great is (S.Gratrix x Constant Love), and it is amazing. Look for this particular clonal name 'Big Gun' in the next year or so as we have several seedlings that have germinated in the lab using this parent.

 

DukeBoxer

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Jason, very nice flower! Just a suggestion with the camera, the macro lens is not really necessary, just get close with the regular lens. When I use the macro lens with my camera (I have a Canon EOS Rebel XTi DSLR) it only focuses on one small point while everything else is a little blurry. I use my 18-55mm lens on the 55mm setting and just get real close, more of the flower comes into focus that way. There is a way to open the aperture more so there is more in focus with the Av (aperture priority) setting, but like I said, it's easier with the smaller lens.

Again, nice flower!
 
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SlipperFan

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Actually, smaller apertures will give better sharpness because of greater depth of field -- until you get to the smallest opening which will probably be less sharp because there is more scattering of light from the aperture edges. The general rule is, the closer you are to your subject, the less depth of field at any given aperture. Also, the closer you are to your subject, the greater the effect of camera motion, making the subject look less sharp. That's why your Macro may be giving you less than satisfactory results, not because it's a Macro. A good Macro lens will give better images of close subjects than will a normal lens, given the same subject distance and aperture setting.
 

rdlsreno

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Actually, smaller apertures will give better sharpness because of greater depth of field -- until you get to the smallest opening which will probably be less sharp because there is more scattering of light from the aperture edges. The general rule is, the closer you are to your subject, the less depth of field at any given aperture. Also, the closer you are to your subject, the greater the effect of camera motion, making the subject look less sharp. That's why your Macro may be giving you less than satisfactory results, not because it's a Macro. A good Macro lens will give better images of close subjects than will a normal lens, given the same subject distance and aperture setting.
I agree!!

Ramon:)
 

DukeBoxer

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Dot, you're right, it's the depth of field thats the most important, but for someone who has never used a DSLR before, it's easier shotting with the smaller lens instead of fooling around with the aperture and depth of field on a macro.
 

SlipperFan

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It may be easier, but it won't give you as good results. Maybe it's better to learn how to use the Macro.
 

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