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Paph coccineum (second flowering)

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myxodex

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I know that this species is not available in the US and I hope that it will be sometime so that we can share experiences with it. Excuse the multiple photos ... this species isn't posted so often, so I thought I'd post a few in different lighting ... the first is the most natural (hazy "almost" sunshine). The second and fourth are accidents, ... the photographer of the house, Brigitt is away ... so you have to make do with my efforts.





Oh ... someone needs to name a clone of this species "Peacock".
Cheers,
Tim
 
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goldenrose

Guest
Oh what a nice one!
You did just fine with the photos!
 
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gore42

Guest
Looks great!

Can anyone tell me what the distinguishing features are for this species (as compared to Paph. barbigerum) ? I can't seem to find a good reference.

Thanks!
-Matt
 
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Ernie

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Looks great!

Can anyone tell me what the distinguishing features are for this species (as compared to Paph. barbigerum) ? I can't seem to find a good reference.

Thanks!
-Matt
Matt,

The strong red flush on the dorsal is diagnostic. It also has a considerable amount of red-brown on the other segmemts too. P. barbigerum has mostly green at the base and center of the dorsal with some tan striping or overlay. I think Ross Hella posted some nice pix of his clone 'G' not too long ago. If I happen across a ref, will holler, but my first guess would be to look in the Averyanov book or maybe the special Paph Orchid Digest volume from a couple years ago (would likely lead to the primary lit). Cheers!
This is a gorgeous flower BTW. :)

-Ernie
 
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Mrs. Paph

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Jealous!!!:drool: That species or var. thereof is first on my want list! I'll let others duke it out as to whether it's a separate species or not, I just really want one for the vibrant colors!
 

myxodex

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Matt, Ernie is right ... I have the Averyanov book (Slipper Orchids of Vietnam, Averyanov, et. al. 2003). These author's have this as the Vietnamese variety of barbigerum, var lockianum and so do not accept this as a different species. Seems reasonable to me. Apart from the colour, this variety can produce bigger flowers (up to 10cm across). Mine has a petal span of 7.5 cm, the pot in the photo has a 10cm diameter. The flower does seem to me to be disproportionally large for the plant even though mine has a smaller flower than usual.
Cheers,
Tim
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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I love it! But these photo's are great at illustrating the logic of considering "coccineum" to be a variety of barbigerum. Compare these
differences to the differences between insigne and insigne sanderianum. If the insigne's can be considred within the same species, than I think it is just as valid for barbigerum. Shape is the same, just a difference in coloration. Take care, Eric
 

Rick

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These guys do tend to run bigger than barbigerum, and there is a prominent pointy tip (not obvious in these pics) to the pouch. I wouldn't claim that this still warrants species status, but I believe the population is disjoint from regular barbigerum, and species have been split off for lesser differences than these.

Barbatum vs callosum comes to mind. And there's still allot of argument over hirsutissimum and esquirollei.
 
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Ernie

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Yep, Paph. barbigerum var coccineum it is (dependong on who you talk to or which ref you happen to be holding at the moment). Also found a more recent Averyanov article in Orchids: Lindleyana about natural hybrids in Vietnam. Seems he considers it a variety of barbigerum. Others call it Paph. lockianum. I recall looking this up at some point and coccineum takes priority???

-Ernie
 

Hien

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Thanks Tim,
for those beautiful posted photos
 
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gore42

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Hmm.... primarily a pigmentation difference, then. I was wondering whether it was as simple as that. Hardly seems worth a species designation, but again... there are certainly those who give out species to just about anything that looks different.

Still, they're really very pretty.

- Matt
 

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