Quantcast

Oncidium question: leaf curl

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
A friend of mine recently gave me some of his oncidium hybrids that weren't growing so well. He decided to grow only phals instead. They were pretty haggard looking when I got them and many of them have leaf curl/crimping on the newest growths. I suspect this may be a sign of under watering so i have been watering them properly and fetilizing 'weekly, weakly'. I also am thinking perhaps they need to be repotted if they aren't blooming. However, some of them are in clay rocks which I have been told they can be left in for the rest of their lives.

Any advice or opinions would be appreciated. I just want to do the best I can to get them back on their feet.

Bluefirepegasus
 

Gilda

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
2,632
Reaction score
50
Location
North East Tennessee, Z6 , Sunroom, flourecent lig
You are right about the crimping of leaves..that is due to underwatering. It sounds like it is growing semi hydro...and they can be left alone for years. Is the pot over flowing with growths ? If so , it might need to be repotted, or watered more frequently. I have an oncid. Sweet sugar , Colm. Wildcat & a Sharry Baby in semi hydro and all are doing great.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
I also have sweet sugar and wildcat. There are a few in the pots with the compressed clay beads in them that appear to have pushed themselves up out of the pot. I suspect I need to repot them....but should I just use the same compressed clay or will the plan care?

Also, this is rather a stupid question but how long until I don't see anymore leaf crimping? And should I water more frequently than everything else? I usually take everyone to the bathtub and turn the shower on them for about 10-15 minutes. Then, I fertilize and leave the doors closed overnight so everything has roots that turn green to absorb the water. I do that once a week. Then, everything gets misted by hand in the morning and at night. Think that is enough?

Bluefirepegasus
 

SlipperFan

Addicted
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
43,287
Reaction score
14
Location
Michigan, USA
Unfortunately, once the leaves are wrinkled like that, they will always be. The hope is for the new growth to be OK.

You have to be careful with oncidiums. Their growth habit is climbing, and by the time the plant has roots outside the pot, the ones inside are often rotted.

Underwatering can cause the leaves to wrinkle, but so can a lack of humidity. Misting, I'm afraid, doesn't last long. It would be better to increase the local humidity with a humidifier, or some other technique. Increasing the watering without checking the status of the roots could be deadly.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
Hmm...good thinking. I think many of the ones I recieved had not been cared for in a long time. I think it is time for me to get to the bottom of the pots and carefully examine all the root systems and re-organize. Do you think oncidiums and their related hybrids care what kind of medium they are in?

My house has high ceilings....do you think a humidifier will do anything for them or perhaps humidity trays would be better?

Bluefirepegasus
 

SlipperFan

Addicted
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
43,287
Reaction score
14
Location
Michigan, USA
Humidity trays may help a little, but I think a humidifier would be more effective. Get one where you can control the output and that has a large reservoir. And also if you don't already have one, get a humidistat.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
a humidistat? what exactly is that and where can I get one? How much do they cost?

Bluefirepegasus
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
A humistat would control a humidifier.
Check your local Ace, Lowes, Menard's or Home Depot for a hygrometer, why pay for shipping if you get can get it around the corner.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
What do you guys think about humidity trays? My husband was worried that a humidifier would encourage the growth of mold. I have been sick inside my lungs this year and won't be able to withstand much mold at all. Do you guys think that the trays would mimick the humidifier well enough? I would just have to change the water out a lot I think and keep things really clean.

What do you think?

Bluefirepegasus
 

Candace

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Elk Grove, CA
Humidity trays don't raise humidity much at all. They're great at catching spills, but do little to nothing for plants. I love the comparison raised on another forum. An open toilet raises the humidity in a bathroom as much as a humidity tray does for plants.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
Well shoot! I was counting on them to help me out. I was looking at a humidifier and my husband brought up the point of mold. Have you ever had any trouble with mold caused by your humidifier? I got really sick this year and my lungs won't be able to handle any mold. We have carpet so I wonder if that will be a factor?

Bluefirepegasus
 

SlipperFan

Addicted
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
43,287
Reaction score
14
Location
Michigan, USA
I think it depends on how much humidity you pump into the air. You shouldn't have a mold problem if you keep the humidity between 50 - 60%, with good air movement.
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
I agree with Dot. Could one even get 50-60% humidity inside a house? If your getting mold obviously, it would be too high, something you wouldn't want to chance.
 

swamprad

Memphis Orchid Society
Joined
Nov 9, 2007
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
0
Location
Memphis
I grow under fluorescent lights on trays filled with water, and my humidity stays between 49% and 60%. I have a hygrometer with a max/min feature that I check every morning and reset. It's interesting that several of you say that the trays of water don't have much effect on humidity. Maybe my baseline humidity is already high, even without the trays. (I do live in the humid South.) One thing's for sure, the trays grown nice green algae and smell bad! :D I've added some algacide to the trays, which helps for a while.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
Gah! I really need to get a better set up. I wish it didn't cost so dang much! I have eight foot ceilings in the room where my orchids are---they are in the living room which is open with the kitchen. It is very big. I wonder if a humidifier would even affect the orchids because of the open spaces? Ideas? Thoughts?

Bluefirepegasus
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
I put my humidifier with the orchids, they like/need the air movement and we benefit as well.
 
B

Bluefirepegasus

Guest
think a humidifier in the open living room will help them goldenrose? if it will I will invest in one for sure. do you have carpet where you have your humidifier? ours would be on carpet so I wonder if that means mold?

Bluefirepegasus
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
Would a humidifier help the plants? YES! I have a GH, when plants are in bloom they're in my house or if they need higher temps than what I want to heat the GH.
Do I have carpeting? YES - infact too much of it with 4 dogs!
Do I have any allergies or sensitivity to molds? Nope, not that I'm aware of.
In my opinion, mold on anything means several things - it's been wet too long, isn't drying out, humidity too high, air circulation poor.
Do I live in the south - NO, I live in the midwest, it's dry indoors, this is the time of year for alligator skin for most of us!
You have to do what's right for you. It may appear that we have some things in common but actually we're on almost opposite ends because of our geological location & individual health.
How many plants do you have? 1-1 1/2 gal.humidifiers run $25-30, which might be adequate for an area where the plants are but may not have much impact on the whole room depending on the size. Another possibility for a small collection - it may not be pretty but it's temporary - enclose it in plastic/vinyl??? You'd be making a mini GH inside, it would be easy to raise the humidity within that area & not affect your health!
Good luck - I'm sure something will work out!
 
C

Corbin

Guest
Humidity trays don't raise humidity much at all. They're great at catching spills, but do little to nothing for plants. I love the comparison raised on another forum. An open toilet raises the humidity in a bathroom as much as a humidity tray does for plants.
I am going to have to differ with you on this one Candace. I grow in a light stand with two shelves. The whole stand is enclosed and I have humidity trays that cover the whole shelf. I monitor with a min/max instrument and record temps and humidity daily. When I see a drop in the humidity that is above the norm I check the trays and the vast majority of the time one or more of the trays will be dry. I will admit that I have a fan on each shelf and the fan is directed so that part of the air current hits the tops of the humidity trays. I am sure the air movement picks up more moisture. As a general rule each self will evaporate into the space one to one and a half gallons of water a week. The humidity in the enclosure, depending on the temperature, will run between 60 and 80 percent while the room itself is maintained at a comfortable temp and humidity.
 

Latest posts

Top