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Tom-DE

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I love kabocha(Japanese pumpkin) and it has a chestnut taste to it... What is this one like?
 

cnycharles

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I love kabocha(Japanese pumpkin) and it has a chestnut taste to it... What is this one like?
That’s a good question! Since I don’t often use squash though I like it, it’s hard to remember the difference between them or the different flavors of them. I think it is a bit sweeter and less watery, more flavor than some winter squash or pumpkins. It’s maybe more depth of flavor especially when it’s roasted or put in pie.

I ate some cold plain before putting in the pie and soup and it seemed to have more flavor than pumpkins I’d cooked a few years ago

I have to say I was impressed with instructions to just drop it from a height to crack them, so when I took a big sweeping hack with my cooks knife was very surprised when it cut almost completely through
 

Tom-DE

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Kabocha is also difficult to open/skinned....and it is not watery either...kinda starchy(in a good way). I don't think it will be good for pie tho.
Do you save any seeds for planting? I planted kabocha last year...and I saved some seeds(more than enough) for this year
 
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abax

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Here's the real question Charles...did you make the crust from scratch???? I've made a couple of attempts that turned
out so-so. I am getting pretty good at bread making, especially Challah. Not so good at pie crusts.
 

cnycharles

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Tom- I’m sorry but hadn’t saved the seeds. I briefly thought about roasting some but didn’t have the time. I think the local farm center might have seeds for sale.

Angela- I used a store made rolled/refrigerated crust. My area is small with limited counter space; though I recently have returned to making basic bread and getting better, I’m not ‘great’ at it, and still haven’t gotten to making my own pie crusts. I had read a few years ago that pie crusts can get hard by letting them be too warm while working and adding too much water. The added fat if melts or liquid I guess can incorporate too much and not make little ‘plates’ between the flour, which when baked allow flakiness. Otherwise it is more solid, meaning tough. One thing I learned on cooks country test kitchen was that you can add alcohol along with the water to the dough so that it’s easier to handle, and the alcohol evaporates during baking and crust stays softer. They advocated cheap flavorless vodka which would leave behind no added flavor to the crust. I guess when you add more water than needed to make easier to work, end result is harder and harder after baking
 

abax

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I've used the Pillsbury crusts and the ingredients listed used cold lard rather than Crisco and such. I'm going to try again with
the lard just to see what happens. Challah is a great bread if you like an egg bread and stays light rather than heavy within a
few days. If you'd like, I can send you the recipe via PM.
 

cnycharles

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I've used the Pillsbury crusts and the ingredients listed used cold lard rather than Crisco and such. I'm going to try again with
the lard just to see what happens. Challah is a great bread if you like an egg bread and stays light rather than heavy within a
few days. If you'd like, I can send you the recipe via PM.
Sure, that would be great, ty. I’ve had challah at my sisters family house, it’s good. Some raisins and dried fruit etc and you’d have a Christmas or holiday bread
 

abax

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When and the form of the bread depends on the Jewish holiday celebrated. My recipe has been passed down through
the family for several generations. It ain't easy and takes some time, but it is delicious.
 

cnycharles

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I saw that you sent the recipe, thank you! I’m honored that it has a long family history, and that I may be able to share it others and we can all enjoy
 

cnycharles

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When and the form of the bread depends on the Jewish holiday celebrated. My recipe has been passed down through
the family for several generations. It ain't easy and takes some time, but it is delicious.
Hey, should challah always be braided? I didn’t remember that until I just saw a pic of a loaf
 

abax

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Sometimes on holidays I fancy it up. Most of the time I just make two 1lb. loaves in a regular bread pan. If you'll excuse
the phrase, this is a daily bread for us. It also makes great French toast, peanut better and jelly...you name it.
 
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