mysterious plants .....

Discussion in 'Tell Me About It' started by goldenrose, Feb 24, 2009.

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  1. Mar 13, 2009 #61

    kentuckiense

    kentuckiense

    kentuckiense

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    Kew lists them as Platantheras. I tried to find the original journal article but my University doesn't have access to Acta Botanica Fennica.
     
  2. Mar 13, 2009 #62

    Clark

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    It is I who is sorry. The field guild I have been using shows Platanthera
    as fringe orchids. Thought the fringe made the genus. Also, another
    text "Wildflowers of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks" by
    Richard J. Shaw, fails to list Platanthera, Piperia, or C. mertensiana from
    a previous post. Thank you all for the educational lesson. After
    viewing photos from the 'net, Platanthera resembles a plant about 10ft
    away from the photo posted. The photo that is on this thread, to me,
    looks like Piperia. I am looking at the way the petals and sepals open,
    especially the dorsal. I will post the other plant by the end of the day.
    Again, thanks to all.
     
  3. Mar 13, 2009 #63

    Clark

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    As per above
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mar 13, 2009 #64

    kentuckiense

    kentuckiense

    kentuckiense

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    Excellent photo. That's another "Piperia" dilatata. I think I'm still going to call these Platanthera until they transfer the whole species complex to Piperia. The more I investigate, the more I conclude that transferring only Platanthera dilatata is erroneous. I really wish I could access the paper and read about why the change was made.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2009 #65

    Ron-NY

    Ron-NY

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    Indian Pipe..Monotropa uniflora I find mysterious. It grows in my woods. Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain chlorophyll. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic, more specifically a myco-heterotroph. Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with trees, meaning it ultimately gets its energy from photosynthetic trees. Since it is not dependent on sunlight to grow, it can grow in very dark environments as in the understory of dense forest.

    http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/monotropaunif.html
     
  6. Mar 13, 2009 #66

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

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    I think I'll just stick to calling them 'bog candles' until some day when they figure everything out...
     
  7. Mar 18, 2009 #67

    Clark

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    This photo was taken about 115ft. from the Piperia, and about 100ft.
    from the Corallorhiza. The tall one is less than 4 inches.
    Pterospora andromedea ?? Sorry if this loaded up large, I lost my patience
    trying to resize.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Mar 20, 2009 #68

    likespaphs

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    some call me brian

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    neat and freaky!
     
  9. Mar 20, 2009 #69

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

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    looks interesting, sort of like raspberry asparagus (always thinking about food)
     
  10. Mar 23, 2009 #70
    It's called pine drops, and yes it is Pterospora andromedea.
     
  11. Mar 23, 2009 #71

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

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    where did you find the pine drops? a professor from syracuse university (suny esf) loves them and would like to know where to go see them
     
  12. Mar 24, 2009 #72

    Clark

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    Yellowstone. If we has seen the bears before hiking, we would not of
    been hiking there. Thanks for looking.
     
  13. Mar 24, 2009 #73

    pealow

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    I think they also smell like rotting flesh!!!!!!!!!

    Paula:eek:
     

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