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I love the Asian grass-leaves “Jensoa” Cymbidiums. I find the traditional pottery and form of the plants existentially satisfying. Sadly, I struggle to grow them. The mountain of dead plants is a whole mood of chagrin.
 

LO69

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If only one Is allowed then no doubts it's Phal. bellina for me!! Love the contrast of magenta and greenish white and the wonderful fragrance too. Plus a long lasting flowering!
Mounted It makes a better display.
 

Happypaphy7

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I can't just pick one. Too many!! :)
My current favorite is Neostylis Pinky that has been in bloom for quite some time now mainly for the sweet fragrance it emits day and night.
The plant itself is too big. I have much smaller Pinky but they are blasting queens. I lost spikes on all four or five of them this time last year and again, two of them just decided to dry up its spike after many months in the work. Frustrating!!

Oh, and Brassavola nodosa just opened up a couple of days ago showing off its lovely heart-shaped white lip offset by thin little green petals, and of course, the powerful scent at night.
Phalaenopsis schilleriana is going to open in about a week or so, and it will become my favorite then. :)

If I ever owned a greenhouse with lots of space and enough cooling in the winter, other than having more Paphiopedilum seedlings (yay!!), I would also love to expand my Neofinetia falcata and Dendrobium nobile type hybrid collection. I love the fragrance of these two groups, and they just look great!
 

NEslipper

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Cattleyas, particularly the heirloom corsage types. Think Bow bells, Bob Betts, and Norman’s Bay. They were bred for vigor and floriferousness, so they are very rewarding to grow, and as a bonus, the blooms smell amazing. They’re also living pieces of history. While most of the plants I listed are post-1940, if you want something old, you can still find divisions of plants from the latter half of the 19th century.
 

LadySlipper

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They’re also living pieces of history. While most of the plants I listed are post-1940, if you want something old, you can still find divisions of plants from the latter half of the 19th century.
That's so amazing. Do you mean plants from before 1940 are still grown today?
 

JustinR

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A huge Cattleya warscewiczii with multiple spikes each carrying 5 or more 25cm flowers. Not much could compete with that for sheer impact I guess.
 

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