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DrLeslieEe

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Did you move plants while spiking? The buds will twist to face light source.
 

DrLeslieEe

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No, I'm careful about that.
Hmmm, only other reason is that the grow area must have a lot of reflected light from all directions to confuse the bud orientation?

I've seen hundreds in bloom at different locations and most cascade in shingles. The only ones that did what is happening to yours is when they were turned around unknowingly.
 

abax

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It's beautiful anyway. Most of the Milts. I've seen that were correctly oriented were staked as the spikes were
developing.
 

masaccio

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Hmmm, only other reason is that the grow area must have a lot of reflected light from all directions to confuse the bud orientation?
I've seen hundreds in bloom at different locations and most cascade in shingles. The only ones that did what is happening to yours is when they were turned around unknowingly.
It seems reasonable to me that reflected light from many directions might help them orient more correctly (as along as they aren't being continually moved around), being less subject to single light phototropism. In a greenhouse they are surrounded by light more so than on a shelf against a wall in a home with overhead spotlights.
I wonder if it is reasonable to posit that 95% (or more) of the ones you've seen were cultured in greenhouses? These (rightly in my opinion) have the reputation of being difficult to cultivate successfully in the home. Many of us try them, and many of us fail; I've failed myself numerous times. Even now with my best efforts, I can't offer lighting conditions comparable to a greenhouse. But I do offer them the next best thing, humidity control, attentiveness to watering and (non heat producing) LED lighting. I guess I can forgive them for thriving and blooming, however imperfectly.
Oddly, that big flower that was upside down several days ago is turning even now. And the fragrance..... I'm actually thrilled. One wishes others to share the excitement. :)
 

DrLeslieEe

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Indeed they are terribly hard to grow indoors due to their needs for cooler temperatures and moist buoyant humidity. Kudos for you to keep them thriving and blooming. Indeed flowering indoors is quite an achievement too.

Yes most of the ones I have seen are in greenhouses in British Colombia, Ecuador and Colombia.

Yet I have seen many grown in homes as well. The ones with the proper positioned flowers all are by the windows (NE usually) with the one main source of light that the buds grow towards, regardless of the reflections around them. The ones with flowers off positioned are usually the ones grown under lights, where usually not one single strong light source could guide the flowers to orient themselves in a row, due to multiple light tubes as well as reflected light off the walls.
 

masaccio

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Indeed they are terribly hard to grow indoors due to their needs for cooler temperatures and moist buoyant humidity. Kudos for you to keep them thriving and blooming. Indeed flowering indoors is quite an achievement too.

Yes most of the ones I have seen are in greenhouses in British Colombia, Ecuador and Colombia.

Yet I have seen many grown in homes as well. The ones with the proper positioned flowers all are by the windows (NE usually) with the one main source of light that the buds grow towards, regardless of the reflections around them. The ones with flowers off positioned are usually the ones grown under lights, where usually not one single strong light source could guide the flowers to orient themselves in a row, due to multiple light tubes as well as reflected light off the walls.
Thanks for the positive feedback, DrLeslie and sharing your experiences. Nothing replaces experience! My tracklights are placed (only because of the inconvenient placement of a ceiling duct) slightly forward of the shelf of orchids. So yes, a long string of them. As well, the setup includes a white backdrop, which I added for the setup benefit of reflected light. (Aha.) I've also noticed varying levels of phototropism among paphs and other orchids preferring similar lighting. Sometimes developing stems will lean slightly forward (the fairrieanum), sometimes, as in my Paph. volunteanum, they develop quite straight with no special attention (but the bud itself has developed a slight lean). And the miltoniopsis, well, as you see.
 

PhragNewbie021

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Haven't seen much growth on mine. I have 2 under lights in a tray with gravel for humidity. I also repotted them from sphagnum into a bark, perlite & sphag mix. Hardly any growth at all. Fertilized weekly, weakly! Any hints? Thanks, Joe. P.S. Lights are on for 9hrs/day. I will bump the lights up another hour in March
 

masaccio

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Are there other plants growing well under the same light setup? Lightwise, I grow them with paphs, somewhat more light, but not a great deal more. I think for most people, light isn't the problem, it's moisture. Constant moisture around the roots and in the air and moderate temperatures.
Both of mine are in straight sphagnum, and relatively small pots, to the point of being rootbound. In that condition they cycle through a lot of water. They're watered at the first point I can discern the pot getting lighter, usually every 2-3 days. They're in a small room in the house with a space humidifier and day temps not much above 75 and an overhead fan which isn't run when the humidity falls below 40%. I've always found bark mixes too arid for them, and I'm not sure that a humidity tray will add much of what they need in RH. These enjoy a moist, moving atmosphere. Or as Dr.Leslie perfectly characterized it, "buoyant" My atmosphere isn't always buoyant, but I'm always trying for it - not only for the milts but all my orchids. Once the right balance is found, they're not particularly difficult or demanding, day-to-day. They grow at a nice rate, they're pretty in or out of bloom, they're predictable and reliable bloomers. One might even say "generous" bloomers. Good luck!
 
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PhragNewbie021

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Thank you for your advice. Looks like I'll be switching back to the sphagnum soon. I think I have them in the wrong window too. I'll get them to a north window where my paph does great Thanks again, Joe
 

masaccio

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You're welcome. Experimenting is a good idea. Leaves should be a light green. If they're in a fine bark mix with sphagnum, I guess I'd call that reasonable. Maybe just try to get it going before making any big changes. You didn't say how long you've had it. And a picture would be great too, if you want to.
 

PhragNewbie021

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I've had it for over 2 years. I will try to put some pics up to show you.
 
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