KelpMax

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Ray

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Yes, the manufacturer states that solutions must be at a pH of 7 or lower.

KelpMax/Kelpak (after 11 years, it’s hard to remember to change the name) can be mixed with fertilizer and/or probiotics, or all three.

The only potential negative comes if you don’t use the mixed solution right away, as in a few days, the organic molecules in the diluted KelpMax will start to degrade.
 
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I'm so glad to get this little elbow in the ribs on KelpMax. I'm a lazy grower so I bought it but never developed the habit of using it. Now, I have a small, pouting Phal. schilleriana. I've had it for 20+ years now. This is the third or fourth keiki I've started and it's been through a lot. It feels great to have something like KelpMax to start it on before the growing season. Hoping it will decide that "life is better."
Also, I have my few little tigrinum seedlings that are doing well, but I'm also starting these on KelpMax. That can only be a good thing for them.
I'm glad I read about the diluted solution not being at its best after a few days. I don't see an expiration on the bottle. It's been a couple of years, I think, since I bought that.
 

Ray

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I don't see an expiration on the bottle. It's been a couple of years, I think, since I bought that.
Kelpak, undiluted, has a shelf life of at least two years, according to the producer. If you refrigerate it, it can last much longer, and a university did an analysis of some that had been on a shelf for 4 years, and found that it was still viable.

The kelp juice is diluted a bit and stabilized with tiny amounts of hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid. Once diluted, the stabilizers are too dilute to do the job. However, it’s not like the stuff flips a switch and goes bad; the degradation is slow. One of the concerns is more about application issues than anything. In the process of handling, pouring, and mixing, it is very easy to introduce bacteria into the tank (don’t forget that all of the producer’s Davis based upon farm use), and once that happens, if allowed to stand, the bacterial colony can grow, forming a white, scummy layer on the top. The concern is blockage of spray nozzles more than actual degradation of the product.

Besides, it’s simply smart practice to mix up only what you can use with any organic product.
 

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