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Hydrogen peroxide... and more...

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biothanasis

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Hi all,

Does anyone know how do we treat orchids with hp? What's the concentration we should use and how much do we apply? Has anyone used cinnamon extract for the same reason (or only powder)? Any information about disinfectinf plants without chemicals would be appreciated.... Thank you all...

Best regards, Thanasis... :)
 

Ron-NY

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I have used it for crown rot, straight from the bottle. I have only used ground cinnamon and have never tried the extract...I don't think I have ever seen an extract.
 

bwester

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I with Ron, thats how i use it. It seems to work better than physan for more extreme surface infections.
 
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biothanasis

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I was guessing that if cinnamon powder is great for leaf disinfection then making a liquid that derives from cinnamon sticks (like making tea...) would be effective enough for disinfecting other parts of the plants (e.g. the roots!!!)!!! Any comments?

I can get several concentrations of hyd. peroxide from the drugstore, so, would 20% be ok? Thank you anyway...

Have fun, Thanasis
 

DukeBoxer

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Regarding cinnamon, I heard a while ago that there is some additive that is in the powder that is anti fungal, not the cinnamon itself. Supposedly the people don't have to list it as an ingredient for some reason like it was put in the cinnamon in the country of origin and there is no law in that country about listing it as an ingredient. Thats what I heard, I could be wrong...Anyone else hear anything about this???
 

littlefrog

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I'm pretty sure there is a natural antifungal in cinnamon. There may indeed be an added agent to cinnamon powder, but I can't imagine how that would make it through the FDA. Even if the country of origin doesn't require labeling, the USA does. If there are unlisted additives added to cinnamon (most of which isn't actually cinnamon but a related tree), that would be a bigger stink than all of the latest food scandals out of China.

In my mind, part of the antifungal activity of cinnamon is the drying action of the powder. Heck, any powder (talcum powder?) would probably do most of the work, cinnamon happens to smell nice and if it has an additional chemical antifungal property more the better. I don't know if the extract would be as effective.
 
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CLMoss

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I am currently have a problem with my 'Cardinale.' First, I tried the cinnamon and that did not solve the problem on the new growth. Second, I tried the hydrogen peroxide, full strength (lightly sprayed), and that did not stop the rot. Finally, I used the phyton... and the plant appears to be doing well. I am not seeing any spreading of brown rot on the new growth. For my particular problem, I feel that I wasted my time using the other treatments. The cinnamon did nothing, and the HP did a bit of damage to the older leaves that were in perfect condition.

Making tea with the cinnamon sounds like a good idea... Try it and let us know! I also think that the dry cinnamon does help with sealing the wound, and my have properties to kill bacteria. In the past I have cauterized (after cutting) and it has worked as well as the cinnamon.

Claudia
 

Candace

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Be sure to use the HP up quick. It loses it's effectiveness upon opening the bottle.
 

Heather

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Here's an article I wrote for my orchid society on Cinnamon and its anti-bacterial/anti-fungal benefits.

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), one of the oldest spices known, is derived from the bark of a small Southeast Asian evergreen tree and is available as an oil, an extract, or a dried powder. It’s closely related to cassia (C. cassia) and contains many of the same components. Due to its’ demand, it became one of the first commodities traded regularly between the Near East and Europe. Ceylon cinnamon is produced in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar, Brazil and the Caribbean, while cassia is mainly produced in China, Vietnam and Indonesia.
Cinnamon has a long history both as a spice and a medicine. It was mentioned in the Bible and was used in ancient Egypt not only as a beverage flavoring and medicine, but also as an embalming agent. Cinnamon’s unique healing abilities come from three active components found in the essential oils contained in its bark: cinnamic aldehyde, cinnamyl acetate, and cinnamyl alcohol.

One famous anecdote involving the use of cinnamon involves the story of Four Thieves in Toulouse, France in 1628-1631 who were caught and convicted of going to the houses of plague victims, strangling them in their beds and then looting their dwellings. For this they were condemned to be burned at the stake. Given the virulence and deadliness of the plague, authorities were astonished by the indifference of the thieves to the contagion. In order to have their sentence mitigated, the thieves revealed their secret preservative, a blend of herbs and essential oils including cinnamon and cloves. After this, sponges soaked in cinnamon and cloves were placed in the rooms of the ill and infirm.

Cinnamon has recently been studied for its ability to help stop the growth of bacteria as well as fungi, including the commonly problematic yeast Candida. In laboratory tests, growth of yeasts that were resistant to the commonly used anti-fungal medication fluconazole was often stopped by cinnamon extract. Researchers at the Institute of Food Technologists’ 1999 Annual Meeting presented findings that revealed cinnamon to be a lethal weapon against E. coli. In apple juice samples inoculated with about one million E. coli bacteria, about one teaspoon of cinnamon killed 99.5 percent of the bacteria in three days at room temperature. Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Dentistry determined in 2004 that chewing a stick of gum would knock out offensive oral bacteria. Although many extracts showed promise, few proved as potent as oily cinnamic aldehyde, the principal flavor compound in cinnamon.

What does all this have to do with orchids? Cinnamon’s anti-microbial nature makes it the perfect natural preventative for common minor orchid ailments. Dust powdered cinnamon on newly cut or damaged leaf surfaces to help heal the cut. Cinnamon has been effective in arresting the development of minor cases of Erwinia (bacterial rot) in some plants. Remove any affected areas of the plant until you reach healthy green tissue, and then dust with cinnamon. However, because of its desiccating nature, using cinnamon on the roots of orchids may not be the best idea. Informal experiments involving the use of cinnamon on healthy root tips have resulted in the roots drying out and shrinking excessively.


Regarding Hydrogen Peroxide - a person in my society swears on a tablespoon per gallon in his watering regimen. We've had numerous discussions about what this would do (other than turn to water) but I often do it because he swears by it (it's Bob Richter if anyone's wondering) and his plants look pretty good.
 

Ray

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I believe hydrogen peroxide is a better "instantaneous" cleanser, but it's actions only lasat a matter of minutes, if that. A cinnamon extract, or the powder (or poultice) will last longer,

Cinnamaldehyde is the active ingredient in cinnamon that has bactericidal and fungicidal properties, and it can easily be extracted from the powder. From my "Home Remedies" page:

You can prepare a cinnamon spray using either alcohol or water as your solvent. The alcohol infusion is faster to prepare, and offers some insecticidal properties as well. This is my preferred method, and has been effective at eliminating all sorts of fungus problems, including damping-off of deflasked seedlings.

Put 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of cinnamon powder in a pint (500 ml) of isopropyl rubbing alcohol. Shake well and let stand overnight. Filter the solution to remove the sediment (coffee filters work well), and use the brown liquid as a spray. (While it's not a big problem for most orchid growers, I've heard that this is good for powdery mildew, as well.)

or

Put the cinnamon powder in hot water. Shake well and let stand for several days. Filter and use as above. (Some feel that the alcohol can be too desiccating when used on seedlings.)
 
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Grandma M

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Ray

I have mixed your cinnamon/alcohol formula and like it. I keep a small bottle always at hand. If the alcohol will work, the mix should do even better as a spray.
 

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