How to Bring out the Best Colors on Variegated Neofinetia?

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Lanmark

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These 7/8 inch ones are really, really tiny. I have a sleeve of them. It's what I used inside my Aoshinju plant's roots, but they would be much too small for my larger plants. Unlike Marco, I like my plants to dry more quickly.
 

Marco

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Myodex. That's even a better option you can custom size and and double layer so the roots don't grow through.

Mark - On average how many times to do you water a neo each week?
 

Happypaphy7

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I use sheer curtain or landscape cloth to line the pots for epiphytes as I hate dealing with roots growing out of the holes.

I just haven't used them on neos yet.
I think I have some good ideas now. I just have to find what I want.

Thanks for all the input.

Now back to the subject, lighting and leaf colors! :)

Of course, keep culture information coming. ;)
 

Lanmark

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Marco, I water daily. They are bone dry by the end of the day. I realize not everyone has the luxury of time to do this. It works very well for me. My plants are happy.

Happy, I'm using T5 for some of my plants and Hyperikon LED 4000K 40° PAR38 lamps for some of my plants.

Here's the T5 fixture: http://www.htgsupply.com/products/growbright-2-foot-tek-light-2-lamp

These are the T5 tubes: http://www.htgsupply.com/products/biax-f55t5-pure-par-bulb

These are the LEDs: https://www.amazon.com/Hyperikon-equivalent-1240lm-Daylight-Dimmable/dp/B00RMK03JO

and these: https://www.amazon.com/HyperSelect-Dimmable-Equivalent-Daylight-UL-Listed/dp/B01HJ4XWBS
 

Happypaphy7

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It may be some work, but it actually is the best way to water daily with quick drying I think, although, I probably won't be doing that for now.

Thanks!

What are some factors involved with shima stripes disappearing?
Random based on gene expression, too little light (I would assume too much light will creat unwanted purple or burning?), wrong feeding??
 

myxodex

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It may be some work, but it actually is the best way to water daily with quick drying I think, although, I probably won't be doing that for now.

Thanks!

What are some factors involved with shima stripes disappearing?
Random based on gene expression, too little light (I would assume too much light will creat unwanted purple or burning?), wrong feeding??


When you say disappearing, do you mean the stripes on striped leaves are turning green from yellow or that the new leaves have fewer or no stripes ?
 

Happypaphy7

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I wasn't being specific, but thank you for pointing the two out!
I'd say both. :D

Regarding the new growth coming out differently,
I notice that there are quite a bit of variability among individual plants even within a variety and behave quite differently, as in "ghost" shoot, plain green shoot with little or no stripes, as well as stripes that are not as sharp as those on the previous growth.
 

Marco

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Marco, I water daily. They are bone dry by the end of the day. I realize not everyone has the luxury of time to do this. It works very well for me. My plants are happy.

Mark - I would absolutely water daily if I could!

As they say, the more cycles the plant goes through the healthier it is!
 

Happypaphy7

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Ok, so while digging around in Korean website, I came across something useful.
It shows four groups by their ideal light requirement (light requirement is shown as LUX), and each group lists some example varieties.

Since I only have a few varieties, I could find almost all. Now, the issue is to buy a good light meter and get to know my light level. hmmmm do I want to go that far...

Anyway, I'll share a few here for those interested...

Strongest (45,000-50,000) : Kinroukaku (but one of mine got cooked,,,each plant might be different I guess), Fugaku, Gojo Fukurin, Tenkei Fukurin

Strong (35-40) : sorry, I am yet to figure out what those names are...lol

Medium (25-30) : Unkai, Nishidemiyako, Higashidemiyako, Tamakongu, Shutennou, Fuji Nishiki

Low (10-20): a few white tiger varieties are shown along with a bunch other that I have no idea other than Seikai.
Fuji Fukurin, Hisui
 
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Happypaphy7

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Marco:

I have a question regarding your Higashidemiyako.
The first photo shows that the variegation is mostly yellow.
The second photo shows only two smaller growths on the front and a few lower leaves on the older growths bear yellow variegation while the older ones in the back show white (cream white), which this variety is supposed to have.
Is the color in the photo correct? or is it due to the angle and the variegation color remains the same as the first photo?

I'm learning about these now that I am interested in more than just plain green ones. :D
 

Marco

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HP - I think they turn yellow as they get older? Or perhaps it could be a cultural difference? Or maybe a combo of both? I'm not sure.

The first photo is from march 2016 while the second photo is from march 2017. Both photos are taken from the same angle. If you take a look at the front most growth leaning slight forward, it's top most leaf is purely yellow and has barely grown in one year.

I could be mistaken, but I think higashidemiyako is suppose of have yellow leaves?

As far as white variegated neos go, I veer more towards a momoyama nishiki. They are not the easiest in maintaining the white variegation. From what I understand, the leaves of these neos are more prone to turning purple. This is why i'veavoiding this particular variety. Here are some photos of momoyama nishiki (first two are pups, last is a little more indicative of size):

2. Momoyama-nishiki 桃山錦 by Seed Engei, on Flickr

2. Momoyama-nishiki 桃山錦 by Seed Engei, on Flickr

73. MOMOYAMA-NISHIKI 桃山錦 by Seed Engei, on Flickr
 

Happypaphy7

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Higashidemiyako is a white stripe (I don't know the corresponding terms in English) and it says the color easily turn yellow under stronger light than it needs, as well as pink and purple tinge in the fall under strong light.
and somewhere in the text also says this variety can mutate into stable yellow stripe variety which is considered a more valuable form. hmmm...

A lot of this is rather confusing to me.
It does say white colored varieties easily change into yellower tone and pink or purple under stronger light. Some people consider that as burn and undesirable as it deviates from what that particular variety should look like while others find it amusing to watch. So I guess it depends on the goal of growing these plants. purely hobby or showing for competition.
 

h_mossy

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Excellent information in response to my earlier question about the inside of the moss mound, especially Happypaphy7 and Lanmark. I'll see how my neo responds. Thanks much!
 

Happypaphy7

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Ok, so it has been about two months, and I am happy to report that the yellow is returning, but just slightly.

What I changed:

I paid more attention to watering trying not to dry it out too much, which I think might have to do with the excessive bleaching (but not in beautiful yellow way like it should) plus reduce the light a little bit since too much purple pigmentation on the leaves and axis was probably caused by too much light although it was fine last year under even more light and its sibling is perfect fine looking under the same conditions.

I also saw the plant coming into spike about a month ago, and I moved the plant to T8 light. Two 4 ft tube about 13 in over the plant.
The excess purple pigmentation is still present which is rather upsetting, but I see the yellow patches are appearing.
It is now showing six little buds on the spike and the roots are active, as well as one red new growth shooting up.

While at the topic, I asked around the neo people and it seems like they are saying that getting yellow tiger stripes in nearly perfect conditions is like a secret due to intense competition at the neo exhibit/show. One is clear. You have to have a good plant that responds well to the treatment. Two, you alternate them between strong light and moderate light with about two weeks interval so as to maintain the color but not to bring out undesired color tones such as purple pigmentation or bleaching.
So, it is still general guideline information that is public and one must try and find out what works as those people who exhibit their fine specimen won't share the secret and it is not a courtesy to ask them. and they won't tell you when asked. So, there.
 

Lanmark

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Definitely there is the thing about alternating between bright light and moderate light at two week intervals during the growing season (some say 4 to 6 week intervals), especially for certain varieties like Kara Nishiki. I think increasing the light level by about 25% in winter is good as well.
 

Happypaphy7

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Definitely there is the thing about alternating between bright light and moderate light at two week intervals during the growing season (some say 4 to 6 week intervals), especially for certain varieties like Kara Nishiki. I think increasing the light level by about 25% in winter is good as well.

I'm still searching for more info regarding each varieties, but it's been difficult.
Some get colors in the spring and others later in the fall, and correct light level is crucial during this time.
High humidity is emphasized for bringing out the color also, but I don't know how that works although all neo or epiphytes in that regard, need relatively high humidity to do well any way.

Kara nishiki (or Takara nishiki, forgot which) is supposedly an extra tricky variety to get a good color on. Right?

Most of the stuff I see are nearly all green with a couple of yellow leaves here and there, while I have seen one with amazing yellow all over the plant.

I don't think I'll buy any more yellow tiger varieties until I get enough practice with my commoners. :)
I just want to collect as much info as possible before venturing out further, if ever, considering I'm wanting to make lots of babies in the mean time. So not enough space for everything I want, as always. haha
 
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