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Has anybody used Neem for killing mealybugs in Paphs?

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SuperPaph

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In recent days, have read about the use of Neem like insecticide, has anybody experience it, please?
 

NYEric

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I use a mixture, water, Neem, rubbing alcohol, Dr. Bonner's lavender oil soap, and for a kicker Merit 75! However, with mealies I only use this after I have removed those I see with alcohol on a Q-tip.
 

Tlynnt66

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I generally use 1 part neem oil, 1 part castille soap, and 3 parts warm water and it does the trick fairly well. I don't like the neem to be too thick in the mixture because it gets down into the roots, which I have found don't much care for being smothered in oil. The castille soap helps to break it up a bit. However, you'll want to use everything that you mix up right away, as the mixture will harden in the spray tube because of the neem. Hope this helps!
 

Djthomp28

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Orthene definitely works better but smells horrible. It's not really indoor friendly. However when I can apply outside, it is in the rotation.

Insecticidal soap works for small outbreaks also. I like it more than neem.
 

Ray

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My outdoor “go-to” is (Orthene) acephate.

I used to be a big proponent of neem oil, but for three failings: the “rotten onions” smell, the limited effectiveness, and I have grown to generally dislike and avoid the use of any oil due to issues with burning and bud/spike loss, especially if plants are warm. Specifically for mealy bugs, which can populate root systems so require pot drenchings, oils are to be avoided altogether.

However, I highly recommend products like Azamax, which is a concentrated form of azadirachtin, the active ingredient in neem oil. Non-oily, it is a contact and systemic insecticide and miticide, affects adults and juveniles (most only affect adults), and is an “anti-feedand”,discouraging critters from feasting on the plants. The odor is mild, and the dried product is not a threat to kids or pets.
 

SuperPaph

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Ok friends, all your opinon are very interesting. Thyank you very much.
I will purchase Orthene, having my first experience on it.
Some times ago I though in using Imidacloprid, and a question emerge now......Could be Orthene better for Maely than Imid?
 

emydura

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My outdoor “go-to” is (Orthene) acephate.

I used to be a big proponent of neem oil, but for three failings: the “rotten onions” smell, the limited effectiveness, and I have grown to generally dislike and avoid the use of any oil due to issues with burning and bud/spike loss, especially if plants are warm. Specifically for mealy bugs, which can populate root systems so require pot drenchings, oils are to be avoided altogether.

However, I highly recommend products like Azamax, which is a concentrated form of azadirachtin, the active ingredient in neem oil. Non-oily, it is a contact and systemic insecticide and miticide, affects adults and juveniles (most only affect adults), and is an “anti-feedand”,discouraging critters from feasting on the plants. The odor is mild, and the dried product is not a threat to kids or pets.
Thanks Ray for your tip on Azamax. I just ordered it. I am having some issues with spider mites and mealy bugs, so this product sounds promising.

I agree with you on the use of oils. I have done some damage to my Paphs over the years using them. Especially with the affects of heat. If you live in a hot climate, I would avoid them.
 
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Ray

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Both acephate and imidacloprid are quite effective on mealies. The trick to eradication is how they are administered:
  • Choose your appropriate pesticide.
  • Treat three times at one-week intervals.
  • At each treatment, thoroughly wet all exposed surfaces of the plant AND drench the potting medium, as they can populate the roots as well.
That should eradicate them. If you see a re-emergence, switch to a pesticide with a different mode of action and repeat that.
 

SuperPaph

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Both acephate and imidacloprid are quite effective on mealies. The trick to eradication is how they are administered:
  • Choose your appropriate pesticide.
  • Treat three times at one-week intervals.
  • At each treatment, thoroughly wet all exposed surfaces of the plant AND drench the potting medium, as they can populate the roots as well.
That should eradicate them. If you see a re-emergence, switch to a pesticide with a different mode of action and repeat that.
Thank you Ray.
 

emydura

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My outdoor “go-to” is (Orthene) acephate.


However, I highly recommend products like Azamax, which is a concentrated form of azadirachtin, the active ingredient in neem oil. Non-oily, it is a contact and systemic insecticide and miticide, affects adults and juveniles (most only affect adults), and is an “anti-feedand”,discouraging critters from feasting on the plants. The odor is mild, and the dried product is not a threat to kids or pets.
Ray - does Azamax work on mealy buds? It doesn't advertise that it does. I need it mostly for spider mites but it would be a bonus if it worked on mealy buds as well.
 

Ray

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@SuperPaph - search for Acephate 97UP. It’s the same product at a better price.

@emydura - over the summer, we had a pyracantha in a relatively secluded part of the yard become completely infested with mealies. They were so thick, the plant looked like it had been sprayed with the fake snow flocking stuff used for decoration. It was literally all white. Three, weekly treatments with Azamax eradicated them. One treatment got almost all, from a visual check perspective.
 

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