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Halloween Orchid

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Drorchid

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This morning I noticed a cool orchid in bloom here in the greenhouse that I have never seen bloom before. It reminded me of some creepy insect/centipede with legs that was about ready to jump on you. The flowers are pretty big; about 4 inches across, and 7 inches from side to side.

The name of the species is Aeranthes henricii. It is native to Madagascar.









Enjoy and Happy Halloween!
 
D

Drorchid

Guest
No unfortunately we do not have any for sale yet, but I will make a sib cross, as there is another plant coming into bloom; so hopefully we will have some babies in the future.

Robert
 
P

PHRAG

Guest
So very fitting, that for Halloween, you trick us with a photo of a cool plant we can't have yet.

:)
 
D

Drorchid

Guest
Yep it was a trick....., but in a few years from now it will be a treat.....

Robert
 
D

Drorchid

Guest
I am not sure, I am guessing it does....I guess I will have to stay overnight here to smell it....

Robert
 

silence882

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Very cool! (and I don't often say that for a non-slipper)

The flower definitely has a Jack-O'-Lantern look to it.

--Stephen
 
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PHRAG

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Does anyone else see a green moth shape in the lip of this orchid? Would it be a stretch to think this plant might be pollenated when a moth tries to land on/mate with what it thinks is another moth? Totally talking out of my range of knowledge here.

In this photo the shape is most obvious to me...

 
D

Drorchid

Guest
Yes from that picture the lip does resemble a green moth but my guess would be that the moth would go more after the nectar in the spur. I am guessing the moth that pollinated this flower has a very long proboscis (tong) that will fit in the long spur. I am not sure if this orchid has nectar there or not, sometimes orchid flowers mimic other flowers and fool the insect in thinking it has food, but at the same time the insect will still pollinate the flower. Most of these white/green Aeranthes/Angraecum species are moth pollinated and have white or green flowers that are fragrant at night to attract their pollinators. I don't think their lips are supposed to resemble the pollinator.

Robert
 

kentuckiense

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PHRAG said:
So it's just a really well shaped landing pad. :)
Yup! It really fits the bill of being moth pollinated.

1. strong scent (I'm guessing)
2. long nectary
3. white (moths tend to be nocturnal)

Think about virtually all Angraecums, Florida's ghost orchid, etc.
 
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PHRAG

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I am working on it secretly. Better to be thought crazy, than open your mouth and remove all doubt.

:crazy:
 

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