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Sirius

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Hi all,

Back on Valentine's day, I bought three potted roses for our apartment. After they stopped blooming, I divided them up and found that they were actually pots full of individual rose plants. I kept about ten 3" pots of these plants. These are micro-miniature roses, and they reach a full grown height of only 12". They have the classic tea rose style blooms and they are dark pink, white with a pink blush, and pure white.

I put them in my greenhouse, not knowing anything about roses, rose culture or really giving them a second thought. Since February, they have really started growing and now they are about to bloom again. I realize now though, that I can't possibly keep all of them. So I am giving away six of these plants to anyone that wants to pay for shipping. I will ship them priority mail, bare root at a cost of $8.

The sixth rose in this group is actually the smallest micro-miniature rose available. It grows to a height of 4-6" tall. It is a named cultivar called 'Si'. It is a small seedling.

So there you are. First person to send me a private message wins.
 

Yoyo_Jo

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Just a thought - do you have a balcony? Those roses would likely do very well outside for the summer in a container, maybe with a few companion plants like bacopa, angallis, lobelia, etc.

I bought lots of them from a grocery store last spring (cheap cheap!) and grew them in containers and right in my garden. They bloomed all through the summer.

Joanne
 

Sirius

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Uhhh, I live in Phoenix, AZ. I don't think roses would do so well in 114 degrees Fahrenheit. :)

It's no big loss if nobody wants these. I will end up throwing them away. I am keeping one plant of each color. I bought them on a whim, and really had no expectation that they would flourish like they have. I started poking around rose growing websites, and discovered micro-miniature roses.

Charles Marden Fitch wrote a book on growing miniature and micro-miniature roses and he talks some about how orchids and roses do well together inside, under lights. So I ordered a few plants from a micro-mini breeder. When those come in, I will need the space.

Anyway, if anyone wants some, let me know.
 

Sirius

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Joanne said she planted some in a container last summer, and they did well. I don't know about frost or freeze hardiness for these, but if they bloom through the summer for somebody and then croak, it would be better than throwing them away.
 
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Elena

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Charles Marden Fitch wrote a book on growing miniature and micro-miniature roses and he talks some about how orchids and roses do well together inside

That's interesting. I tried growing those mini roses before and killed every single one of them :sob: I'm kinda tempted to try again after reading that. Shame I'm in UK.
 

Sirius

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Everything I read online said there was no way I could grow roses in my conditions, and that it was pointless to grow them indoors. All the culture sites said roses bloom better at cooler temps.

The Fitch book says they grow best at warmer temps. I am inclined to agree with him. Bright light, plenty of water and high humidity seem to make them really happy.

After I repotted them, I gave them all a good trim. They have grown so much that they are back to the same height they were when I bought them. And they have buds starting to form.

The experiment continues.
 

Candace

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I had some mini-roses growing in the ground here in Northern CA. We'd get frost in the winter and they were fine with that. I know that doesn't help those of you living with snow. The only problem I ever had with them was aphids. But, any roses I've ever grown mini or otherwise seemed to be aphid magnets.
 

Sirius

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But, any roses I've ever grown mini or otherwise seemed to be aphid magnets.
I gaurantee these to be aphid free. Seriously Candace, you should get a job marketing for the American Rose Society. :)
 

Candace

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They offered me a job, but I'm already working for the s/h industry and had to decline. I'm too popular, I know.
 

Yoyo_Jo

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Can you plant them outdoors? In normal, non-helldom conditions? If so, I might take them....
Yes, yes and yes! (Well, maybe not in Arizona, LOL...)

They do very well here (the North Pole, kind of reverse of helldom). People even are able to overwinter them here by covering them with peat moss and soil in the fall; then uncovering them around April.

Joanne
 

Sirius

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Can someone provide links to scientific studies determining the hyper-attractiveness of roses to insects, above say an oncidium?

Or are we just throwing around random ideas that roses cause global warming and can kill puppies with laser beams projected from the thorns? :)
 

gonewild

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Can someone provide links to scientific studies determining the hyper-attractiveness of roses to insects, above say an oncidium?

Or are we just throwing around random ideas that roses cause global warming and can kill puppies with laser beams projected from the thorns? :)
Scientific studies show it is actually phaser beams from the leaf tips that kill the puppies and not the laser beams from the thorns.
 

Sirius

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Scientific studies show it is actually phaser beams from the leaf tips that kill the puppies and not the laser beams from the thorns.
I forgot you were a trekkie. Sorry, PHASER beams. :)

Anyway, the point is that roses are horrible, smelly plants that spread herpes and caused the great depression.

I still have six of them to send to a new home. They go in the trash once the new roses come in.
 

gonewild

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You could make herbal tea out of them rather than throw them away. :rollhappy:

I think roses attract more pests than orchids because they taste good and orchids don't. They are more edible and probably don't contain any natural harmful chemicals.
 

Sirius

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Meh. The worst aphid infestation I have ever seen was on an orchid that someone shipped to me. Not to mention mealies, and the mites that destroyed one of my phals. They can't taste that bad. Now Tetrasan and Enstar are my good friends.

Anyway, the roses have found a new home. We can commence with the "ooh-aah" and "lovely" over bulldog paph threads once again.
 

snow

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just a warning
miniture roses are notorious for spidermite when grown indoors under lights
i would keep them far far away from my orchids
 

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