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Heather

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Hmmm, I need to think about that one.

I worked at a museum that had quite a few Hudson River School landscapes. There are some nice ones. Bierstadt's Mt. Ascutney was my favorite there, but I don't think it's my overall favorite!

http://www.fruitlands.org/collections/gallery/thumbs/bierstadt1.jpg

I'll have to think on it some more, I'm afraid.
 
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OP or not, I’m going to stay pretty neutral…it’s not my place to commend or disparage anyone’s tastes really, just curious. I will say I was both amused and pleased to see Franz Marc’s name though—I compiled my very first art history “report” on his work in the 6th grade!
 
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That's easy!

Just kidding. I'd probably have to go with Hieronymus Bosch's acid trip triptych centered around "The Garden of Earthly Delights."
Wow, totally random that you mentioned that, my friend and I were just talking about it today. I never would think to like such a piece but I got to see it at the Prado when I was in Madrid over the summer, and I have to see that it's one of the most stunning objects that I've ever seen.
 

kentuckiense

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Wow, totally random that you mentioned that, my friend and I were just talking about it today. I never would think to like such a piece but I got to see it at the Prado when I was in Madrid over the summer, and I have to see that it's one of the most stunning objects that I've ever seen.
Yeah, I always figured it was just the size of a "normal" painting, but the thing is taller than me!
 

Candace

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Either the Mona Lisa or Last Supper so I could sell them, get stinking rich and buy what I actually liked;> And it would probably be a sculpture, not a painting.
 
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Aw, you’re a sweetheart Eric! :eek: But I’m not dead yet. It may happen any day though--apparently all you have to do to get a driver’s license around here is spit on the application.

Candace, I think my husband is with you actually. If limited to art, he’d probably use the proceeds on a Rodin or Avengers #1 (silver age comic book)…or this Fuseli piece: http://www.dia.org/the_collection/overview/full.asp?objectID=45573&image=1 because of the awesome demons.
 
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Eric, my wording was subtle, but I did suggest deceased. Have you seen the Hiroshige print I posted a link to at the Met? I didn’t realize they had one of them till I stumbled across it a couple of years ago. A wonderful surprise. I love all the nature-inspired ukiyo-e woodcuts.
 

TheLorax

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Moving this over here to streetmorrisart's other thread.

Any one piece of art? Interesting question.
Only one?
Eesh, that's hard because I would probably be of Candace's mindset.

Well, for 2D- http://galleryone.com/images/bateman/bateman_-_wood_bison_portrait.jpg
http://www.royalroads.ca/NR/rdonlyres/E6D7160F-FEE9-4B59-A8E1-580D2EB78BA9/0/bateman_buffalo.jpg
Robert Bateman (not deceased), sold for like 1M to an art museum in Jackson Hole

For 3D- There is a magnificent signature bronze sculpture/elevated pond/wetlands depicting indigenous species in a local Forest Preserve.
Eric Blome (not deceased), sold it for a couple hundred thousand. I'll take two.
 

Persephone

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Here's one....

Since I have a BA in Fine Arts and an MFA, this is very difficult for me. Today Modigliani is my favorite, tomorrow someone else.
 

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I imagine you earned an MFA so you could teach? The woman who cut my hair in Ann Arbor introduced me to Modigliani. She had (has I would imagine) good taste in art.

TheLorax, NYEric, it was totally alright, but thanks. There was something surreal about having a piece of art that sold for a million referenced in my so-called “vendor thread”! At least the first cyp-inspired piece sold for a decent price to a good patron, and the second is being held on purpose for a show. I’ve learned people who want to find me do so through Google or the occasional eBay promotion, so this forum is largely for fun. You can’t miss me if you’re searching for orchid art especially.

Back to the second most recent post, I realize I’m in the minority for being less impressed by detail outside the realm of 35mm photography. I can understand the appeal of traditional wildlife paintings, and I would never deny Bateman’s skill. The work that makes my heart skip a beat is more design-oriented though. I have a great deal of respect for talented graphic artists, illustrators, animators…I will come back as the latter in my next life! My reasoning is if you add enough marks you can trick the mind into perceiving reality, but the ability to distill ideas and images down to something evocative and completely unlike what a camera can capture is a skill I admire greatly and will always be working toward in a fine art context, at least for a good portion of my working hours. If you love a certain subject matter though, I can understand wanting to own a more direct representation of it; I would never disparage anyone for that and try to maintain the ability to some extent to remind myself I can do that. I wish I could summon my grade school level of talent and combine it with what I know now though, even reset myself by five years. It’s almost traumatizing when I hear things like, “You’re getting better, kiddo!”, because I know I’m not in many respects.

Back to other people’s art though! Interesting to hear about everyone’s tastes, and I like everything mentioned in seriousness so far. That said, I probably wouldn’t speak up if I didn’t because it doesn’t matter.
 

TheLorax

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You see- if I could have Bateman's piece (which I do love) I could hang it on a wall and enjoy it while I advertised it and sold it and then I could go out and buy at least a 100 of many pieces of fine art that also please me... such as your first slipper painting. I'm not so much into big names as I am into works that speak to me. I don't deny his gift/skill nor do I deny his unparalleled ability to market himself but imagine how many pieces of fine art I could surround myself with that spoke to me if I could have his painting to be able to pull a Candace and sell!

I must admit I love that Blome bronze though and that I'd keep. Wish I had a photo of it particularly since you like more design-oriented works.
 

Persephone

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Actually, I earned an MFA because I just wanted to. I don't teach, and I don't paint any more either. I consider my talent as pretty much mediocre even though my degree is from a prestigeous school.

A gallery that was considering investing in my work way back when I was in my mid-20's had concerns that I was a young woman and that I may have children and stop painting. Needless to say I was very very much insulted. Well......four children later it seems that he may have had a point. I expressed my artistic leanings in my garden and in my mothering and somehow that was very satisfying. What I do explain to people is that being an artist is just an expression of the creative drive and intellectual pursuits of divine balance (am I getting a bit too heady here?) It's interesting to note that so many people who are into plants and gardening are artists.

If you enjoy your work, that's all that counts.
I find it very striking.
 
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Barbara

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Hi Persesphone, you sum up my experince very well. I to went to school and earned an art degree (York U) then put the brush/pencil down and turned my back on the art world and fine art. I seem to find working with the earth to be much more satifying and rewarding that producing reams of art work. Although that too was very important way of self expression at the time. Artistic expression is about development of the Self, however that may manifest itself and to me, no one art form can be considered more poignant than the next.

It's hard for me to pick just one piece of art or even one artist, since it is the entire body of work that denotes the core of the artist's journey. But I'll choose two artists who where both men who seemed to understand their place in the natural world.

J.M.W. Turner:
http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/turner/gallery3d.htm


Andy Goldsworthy (not deceased):
http://www.artnet.com/Artists/ArtistHomePage.aspx?artist_id=7145&page_tab=Artworks
 
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