Drosera rotundifolia in the north

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Critters' started by naoki, Jun 24, 2016.

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  1. Aug 6, 2016 #21

    SFLguy

    SFLguy

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    If there's one thing these plants don't like, it's drying out haha
     
  2. Aug 6, 2016 #22

    naoki

    naoki

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    Very nice! If you get hold of some seeds, we can trade some seeds!

    From this map, there are records in NW territories. Alaska is also included, but I didn't find any in our herbarium records.

    Hmmm, I'm just using typical Drosera culture (1:1 peat:perlite, bottom water) for D. filiformis. I'm guessing that we don't have enough heat. I tried direct sun outside, but it is usually 70/50F max/min. Now it is indoor under light (others are doing ok), but it stays <80F most of the time. When I give food, the leaf becomes brown. I did get seeds from ICPS seed bank, and I'll see if they will do better than one clone I have.
     
  3. Aug 7, 2016 #23

    SFLguy

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    How much humidity do you grow them with?
    Do you let the tray dry out between watering?
    I tried to get a picture of mine earlier but it's hard without an actual camera
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Aug 8, 2016 #24

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

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    Nice filiformis SWF Guy! I miss walking through the fields of them in the Florida panhandle.

    Here is D. rotundifolia growing in a an upland bog (elevation ~1500 meters or 4,875 feet) in central Kyushu that I took back in 2006.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Aug 8, 2016 #25

    SFLguy

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    I have yet to see rotundifolia in situ surprisingly enough haha, dews are always so interesting

    Actually, if you saw them in the panhandle it's likely that those were D. trayci (very closely related and used to be a part of filiformis). The distinguishing trait is that trayci is mostly green while filiformis also has red in it
     
  6. Aug 9, 2016 #26

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

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    Yup, in Liberty County, so most definitely D. tracyi. Fields of them covered in dew with the morning sunrise lighting them up. Quite a nice view. I've only seen the real filiformis in NJ many years ago as a teenager.
     
  7. Aug 9, 2016 #27

    naoki

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    Very nice, SFLguy! RH is around 50-70%, I don't let it dry too much. Do you think that it is a problem for this species?

    I didn't know D. tracyi was separated out.

    Thanks for the in situ photo, Tom! Highland bog in central Kyushu means Kujuu region, which is an amazing area?
     
  8. Aug 9, 2016 #28

    SFLguy

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    Did you see the Sarracenia too? Those are usually nearby in Liberty Co, I've only seen filiformis in cultivation but I saw trayci in the same place as you haha
     
  9. Aug 9, 2016 #29

    SFLguy

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    No, that should be fine
    I believe the separation is a fairly recent occurrence
     
  10. Aug 10, 2016 #30

    KyushuCalanthe

    KyushuCalanthe

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    Naoki, yup, very near Kujuu peak itself. I've also seen this species in upland bogs on the Hiraodai karst plateau near Kitakyushu, growing right alongside Habenaria radiata. Kujuu is a nice area, but unfortunately overrun, particularly in the popular seasons, summer and fall.

    Sure, fields of them - leucophylla, psittacina, rosea, and various flava forms. Nice place to visit when they're in flower especially.
     
  11. Aug 12, 2016 #31

    SFLguy

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    [​IMG]
    Forgot i had a picture of one of the babies
     
  12. Aug 12, 2016 #32

    SFLguy

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    I can imagine haha
     
  13. Aug 17, 2016 #33

    Heather

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    No kidding! I just cooked my capensis not too long ago. Luckily it had a bunch of new leaves coming and it has recovered. It gets a lot of sun. I've had a tough time finding a less sunny place to put it lately - hence the cook.

    We had rotundifolia in our bog back in Central Ma. The thing about bogs (this was a kettle hole) is that they tend to be very chilly waters. We had lots of tamarack and cranberries in there as well. VERY different habitat from anything else in that area.
     
  14. Aug 18, 2016 #34

    SFLguy

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    That is interesting haha
    The bogs in northern Florida are pretty warm, but then again where in Florida is it not?
     

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