cyps in pots 2015

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selected tibeticum

this is from Holger Perner earlier this year.
Nice flower and hopefully it will manage to establish itself unlike others I have bought from him in the past,
David
 

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and now some hybrids

Gabriela continues to grow like a weed and this year has about 35 stems and flowers.
the whole plant is over 2 feet across,
David
 

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michael in two forms

Hi,
both the normal and alba forms are flowering well this year.
A slender growing plant with smallish flowers but up to three on a stem,
David
 

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PotomacV

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:drool: beautiful plants as always. Do you find the species are difficult to grow?
 
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Species

Apart from a couple like reginae and fasciolatum which are fairly straight forward I find most species much less tolerant than hybrids. They grow fine for a bit and then go downhill or die.
David
 
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A better video clip

A second attempt with the iPad and YouTube of videoing the plants currently flowering. At least this time I have remembered to hold the iPad in landscape and there is also a rather stuttering commentary to go with it.
The clip is called cypripediums in pots three and you will have to search as my computer skills have not found the copy and paste function yet!
Regards
David
 
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Tom,
Interesting - why do you think the white one could be a hybrid and what with?
The huge white Sabine is something special. Only second year flowering size and already seven growths and three flowers.
Wait until it is the size of the Sunny!
Regards,
David
 

eggshells

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That's amazing. I'm starting to culture them on pots too but I buried them in the winter. I'm successful on culturing Cyp. pubescens and my reginae (from EU I think) has survived -30 to -40 temperatures buried in soil.

Can you recommend a hybrid or species that can survive -30 to -40 temps (yes, don't laugh) when buried outside?
 

Linus_Cello

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That's amazing. I'm starting to culture them on pots too but I buried them in the winter. I'm successful on culturing Cyp. pubescens and my reginae (from EU I think) has survived -30 to -40 temperatures buried in soil.

Can you recommend a hybrid or species that can survive -30 to -40 temps (yes, don't laugh) when buried outside?

I'm not sure how winter hardy the following are, but I find Gisela and Sabine Alba to be very vigorous hybrids.
 

KyushuCalanthe

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Tom,
Interesting - why do you think the white one could be a hybrid and what with?
The huge white Sabine is something special. Only second year flowering size and already seven growths and three flowers.
Wait until it is the size of the Sunny!
Regards,
David

Agreed, that Sabine will be amazing when it gets big. About the white fasciolatum - it is just an idea in my head. Some years back a "new variety" of fasciolatum was coming out of China with a white lip with pink flushing. The sepals and petals were more colorful on some as well. I knew folks growing them so I saw a few good examples. Then in one of Holger Perner's articles I saw very similar looking plants. I asked him about it and he said they were indeed probably hybrids, perhaps introgressing with C. franchetti. I believe the region he saw them was in western Guizhou Province.

So, long story short, I just was wondering aloud if white lipped fasciolatum have some franchetti blood in them. Does your plant have any pink flushing on the lip (not the inside markings)? As you know, the artificial hybrid between the two species is Pluto which shares similar characteristics.
 

parvi_17

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That's amazing. I'm starting to culture them on pots too but I buried them in the winter. I'm successful on culturing Cyp. pubescens and my reginae (from EU I think) has survived -30 to -40 temperatures buried in soil.

Can you recommend a hybrid or species that can survive -30 to -40 temps (yes, don't laugh) when buried outside?

Here in Edmonton, I have a collection of around 50 different species and hybrids. Some, such as fasciolatum and hotei-atsumorianum, I have been told are "not hardy" here. However, they overwinter reliably for me year after year, and our winters are similar to yours I think. The list of species that won't overwinter here is relatively short. C. formosanum and japonicum are the only readily available ones that are on that list. The vast majority of the others are worth trying. If you want to try some of the Asian species like macranthos or tibeticum, the main thing is making sure they have really good drainage. Usually they are fine for us in the prairies because, except for the Chinook zone, we don't get too many midwinter thaws.

As for the hybrids, I have pretty much every one that is seen often, and I have never lost one to winter kill. Even ones with "questionably" hardy parentage like Ursel overwinter just fine.

Hope this helps!
 

naoki

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eggshells, C. guttatum would be a sure shot. Some populations of this wide-range species are in USDA zone 2a or 2b (near Fairbanks, AK). I keep them in the heated garage (5C), though. The shoulder season is the tough part for plants. We don't get lots of snow and my plants are still in the 3rd year after deflasking, so I'm being a bit more cautious. For the other warmer Cyps, I seem to have some issues with too short growing season. I have to figure out something; e.g., start them earlier indoor or bring them indoor in the fall.

Very interesting info, Joe! I think you are in Zone 4a, right?
 

parvi_17

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Very interesting info, Joe! I think you are in Zone 4a, right?

Zone 3a, actually. It usually gets down to -40 C for a couple days at some point in the winter here. Last year was the first mild one we've had in years. But, the snow cover is usually quite good.
 

eggshells

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Yes I am in Zone 3a as well. Thanks Joe and Naoki. Joe, I will try to get those species. Though it may be too late this spring. Will check with Shawn Hillis.
 
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Fasciolatum

Tom
I am pretty sure that the white fasciolatum was bought as an unflowered seedling about six years ago.
None of the flowers have any pink flushing on the lip so the jury is out on this one,
David
 

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Calcicola

Hi

First flowering of this species for me and bought from Holger Perner last winter.
Smaller and much darker than tibeticum. Holger states that this is the true species and not a dark tibeticum.
This close up was taken with the iPad. Not bad!

David
 

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