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Cypripedium subtropicum line drawing

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kentuckiense

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I stumbled across the line drawing from the description of this elusive species. I've put in an interlibrary loan request to get the whole article. Anyway, here it is:


It really does like very Selenipedium-esque, no?

My apologies about the small size. I couldn't find any larger.
 

Jon in SW Ohio

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It definitely does look Selenipedium-esque.

BTW, did you see the article on Cyps in the new AOS bulletin (Orchids)? There's a pic of an almost black Cyp that I couldn't take my eyes off of!

Jon
 

kentuckiense

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Jon in SW Ohio said:
There's a pic of an almost black Cyp that I couldn't take my eyes off of!
The C. palangshanense? It's gorgeous. It looks related to C. debile and our native C. fasciculatum.
 

Jon in SW Ohio

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The nearly black one I meant is the Cyp. tibeticum on the right side of page 917 in the December 2006 issue. I dont' think I've ever seen anything like it!

Jon
 

kentuckiense

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Lien is scanning the article for me! I'm excited.

Also, the description of C. subtropicum arrived today! However, just about everything but the abstract is in Mandarin(I think).
 

VAAlbert

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Cyp subtropicum does seem to have 'primitive' characters for the plicate-leaved genera, though the overt flower similarity to Selenipedium (incl the column) could be pollinator syndrome convergence. 'Primitive' Paphs, Phrags, and Mex all have the basically inflated labella that almost all Cyps and all Selens bear. Thus, the inflated pouch feature can be considered 'primitive' in the whole slipper orchid group, by the principle of parsimony. The main features that stick out for me with Cyp subtropicum are the stem habit, incl height and leaf form, and many-flowered raceme. This gives one an impression of relatedness to Cyp californicum. The habit is also similar to Cyp irapeanum, and based on molecular data, irapeanum is the baslmaost Cyp, probably followed by californicum, then the rest. So, it would not surprise me if subtropicum were also very near the evolutionary base of the Cyps. East Asia/North America disjunctions are very well-known in other plant groups, and both californicum and irapeanum are good contenders for this connection (which probably dates to a Bering land bridge connection).

Best,

Vic
 

KyushuCalanthe

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Am I correct in my understanding that no photograph of a living specimen exists?
None that have been shown publicly. Even Dr. Holger Perner couldn't find one in his search for this species and he talked directly to the guy who was on the team that discovered it! The original population was washed away by a flood.
 

kentuckiense

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:eek: Hopefully someone collected some.
I would have to doubt it. Even if some were collected, they are probably dead seeing as this group of Cyps has yet to be successfully cultured long-term.

However, hope remains in that I believe this area is extremely restricted by the Chinese government because it is claimed by both China and India.
 

cnycharles

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None that have been shown publicly. Even Dr. Holger Perner couldn't find one in his search for this species and he talked directly to the guy who was on the team that discovered it! The original population was washed away by a flood.
maybe looking downstream in a floodplain soon might reveal some?
 
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