Compact multifloral paphs?

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Corbin

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I would like very much to have some mulitfloral paphs. so I am asking for recomendations.

Thanks,
 

Heather

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laevigatum (the smaller form of P. philippinense.)

There's another nice compact multi out there that is related, philippinense var. aureum 'Greenlace' JC/AOS. Marilyn LeDoux at Windy Hill Gardens sold me one a while back.

Both were easy to grow and bloom, and did so frequently for me.
There are photos here if you search on them.
 
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Elena

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I believe Paph wilhelminiae is compact.

My phil var. roebelinii is actually pretty compact as far as multis go.
 
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Ernie

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Adductum, wilhelminae, and phil v laevigatum are your compact multiflorals; for the "other multiflorals" (Pardalopetalum) look for lynniae, but good luck. AnTec has a great article on "Downsizing Multiloral Paphs" on their web site ladyslipper.com.

-Ernie
 

Rick

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Adductum, wilhelminae, and phil v laevigatum are your compact multiflorals; for the "other multiflorals" (Pardalopetalum) look for lynniae, but good luck. AnTec has a great article on "Downsizing Multiloral Paphs" on their web site ladyslipper.com.

-Ernie
Sounds good to me. My wilhelms have leaf spans of about 7 inches. But they are prone to have no more than 2 flowers per spike. There are compact varieties of phil, and laevigatum seems to be consistent. Some roebelini are reportedly small too, but all the ones I've got are huge.

One species that doesn't get any press but I saw a fantastic one at a show is richardianum (A small variety, or maybe species) similar to lowii. And some dianthum stay pretty small too.
 

ohio-guy

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you might look for Lyro blackhawk, (wilhelminae x St Swithen) which blooms on a small plant and looks like a dark Phil roeb to me.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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My philipinense...the one that is spiking now after 20 years...is quite compact...won't know what variety it is until the blooms open...There's a photo of it under the "Finally" thread. Take care, Eric
 

Roy

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There seems to be an influence on suggesting species here. There are many Hybrid multiflorals that fit the bill which are probably easier to grow and flower for some one to start with.
My suggestions :
Honey - prim x phili
Mamie Wilson - prim x lowii
Prime Child - prim x roth............not all are small though
Toni Semple - hayn' x lowii
 

Carol

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I have a Paph Lyro Blackhawk growing in s/h that is compact and a vigorous grower. It has 2 spikes, with 4 buds each and hopefully it will be in bloom for our show, March 15 & !6. If anyone is in the Pittsburgh area, please come to the show, "Orchid Party in the Park". Admission is free and judging is on Friday, March 14. More info available at www.oswp.org.
 
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potteryman

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Hi Carol..I have 2 small Lyro Blackhawk plants...any info you would care to share regarding their culture?..thanks in advance...
 
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goldenrose

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Is anyone else finding the recommendation on Lyro Blackhawk confusing?:confused: The comments are that they bloom on small plants but I would think having St.Swithin as a parent, they are not going to stay/remain compact.
 

Roy

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Is anyone else finding the recommendation on Lyro Blackhawk confusing?:confused: The comments are that they bloom on small plants but I would think having St.Swithin as a parent, they are not going to stay/remain compact.
Rose, I would think they may stay smallish as has been said wilhelminae is small and St Swithin grown away from the tropics doesn't get overly large but I would think bigger than compact. I will all come down to culture in the end.
Not one I would recommend though, just incase.
 
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goldenrose

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Thanks Roy - I think we're on the same line of thought but that didn't seem to be expressed in previous posts. If it comes down to culture, if one does not give correct culture that does not result in a good growing plant then chances are it's going to be difficult to bloom (or bloom poorly), defeating the whole purpose of acquiring the plant!
 

Carol

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This is my Paph Lyro Blackhawk with 2 spikes and 8 growths. I do not think it is a large plant for a multi-floral paph. I grow under fluorescent lights and this one is in s/h. It seems to be a vigorous grower, although it lost a blooming size growth to rot last year around this time of year and did not bloom.
 

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goldenrose

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Thanks for posting Carol! I agree with you, I wouldn't expect the one parent to have that much influence on size. Hopefully, if a young plant was taking after the St.Swithin parent, one would notice it & chose accordingly if space were an issue.
 

Rick

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I'm not sure how good an article this is. I've been through the ringer on this one with Joan Levy.

According to Joan, wilhelm does not exist in the United States, and everything called wilhelminea is actually gardineri (or a hybrid of gardineri and praetens). According to Joan and Dr Garay, if it has twisted petals its not wilhelm.

The article posted makes very little (if any) reference on where all these species are supposed to come from other than New Guinea. Cribb shows wilhelm coming from high elevation in New Guinea, and in situ pictures show a flower with twisted petals. Praetens or glanduliferum are from lowland New Guinea. It's hard to find any reference for a collection location for gardineri, but I did manage to find on local of an island off of New Guinea. I'm not sure if the description of gardineri was based on anything more than one herbarium specimen of unknown origin.

Subsequently, I hold to Cribbs taxonomy with wilhelm coming from the highlands, 1-2 flowers (rarely 3) and plant size on the order of 6-8 inches in span. The lowland species (either called praetens or glanduliferum) is a bigger plant, slightly paler flowers, and 3-4 flowers per spike.
 

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