Quantcast

Cattleya labiata peloric

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

Guldal

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
2,370
Reaction score
757
Location
Copenhagen, Denmark
Beautifull... and interesting flower!

Did you buy it because of it being peloric - or was that just coincidental?
 

DrLeslieEe

Collector of new, rare and albino paph species
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
2,239
Reaction score
1,553
Location
TORONTO CANADA
I think it’s just opening? Can you take closer pics of petals and dorsal when fully open? Im
Interested to see patterns so we can name it properly.
 

monocotman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2009
Messages
1,878
Reaction score
510
Location
Cambridge, UK
I cannot open the photo, I just see a black screen. I can see the thumbnail.
Interesting clone,
David
 

Ozpaph

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
16,369
Reaction score
478
Location
Brisbane, Australia
Cant say i love it; but very interesting and different. Not seen this 'peloric' form in cattleya before.
 

dodidoki

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,874
Reaction score
260
Beautifull... and interesting flower!

Did you buy it because of it being peloric - or was that just coincidental?
It is just coincidental.I bought as warneri albescens.
 

PaphMadMan

phytomanic
Joined
Feb 12, 2008
Messages
2,040
Reaction score
6
Location
Madison, Wisconsin USA
Technically not peloric, since that means that a zygomorphic (bilateral symmetry) flower has become more actinomorphic (radial symmetry). Here the set of sepals have become less similar, so the flower has less radial symmetry, not more. Labelloid is correct for describing the lateral sepals that have become more like the labellum.

Regardless of terminology, it's an interesting flower.
 

dodidoki

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,874
Reaction score
260
Technically not peloric, since that means that a zygomorphic (bilateral symmetry) flower has become more actinomorphic (radial symmetry). Here the set of sepals have become less similar, so the flower has less radial symmetry, not more. Labelloid is correct for describing the lateral sepals that have become more like the labellum.

Regardless of terminology, it's an interesting flower.
Thanks for explanation.👍
 

DrLeslieEe

Collector of new, rare and albino paph species
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
2,239
Reaction score
1,553
Location
TORONTO CANADA
It is just coincidental.I bought as warneri albescens.
Definitely not warneri or albescent lol.

Is this first bloom?

PMM is right. The type of pelorism in sepals is called labelloide (vs trilabelliae in petals). It is associated with a genetic instability factor, as most plants will change with subsequent bloomings (as I have bloomed this in normal plants, and also confirmed by growers in Brazil). There is a population in Serra de Maranguape (in Ceara state) where the occurrence of labelloide flowers is more common than other habits (source: Lou Menezes, Cattleya labiata book).

The test is next blooming to see if this reoccurs. If it does this for 3 straight blooming, I can definitely say it’s stable on this plant. And I must have a division lol.

I must admit I love the large dorsal.
 
Last edited:

SouthPark

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2018
Messages
436
Reaction score
125
Location
Queensland, Australia
Definitely lip feature patterns on the lower sepals. Definitely need to have a word with the painters/renovators hehehe. Actually, it is a nice and interesting effect.

The upper sepal has turned into a petal. And the remaining sepals have some lip features, and those sepals are tending to grow toward a vertical orientation, rather than angled outwards.

If it keeps developing the same sort of flowers year after year, and no 'regular' flowers ------ then that would be so nice! Nice and individual.
 

dodidoki

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,874
Reaction score
260
Thanks for kind words.Very interesting that this " pelorism"- sorry, i have no better word - is variable not just from blomming to blooming , but even more within the inflorescence.I made a cross between this and dowiana aurea, I expect nice yellow veins on lower sepals. The cross will bloom within 2 years.
 

SouthPark

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2018
Messages
436
Reaction score
125
Location
Queensland, Australia
Thanks for kind words. Very interesting that this " pelorism"- sorry, i have no better word - is variable not just from blomming to blooming , but even more within the inflorescence. I made a cross between this and dowiana aurea, I expect nice yellow veins on lower sepals. The cross will bloom within 2 years.
This kind of mutation is nice. Giving us something nice and different to see. Totally interesting and wonderful. And I think I read somewhere in the past - that 'pelorism' can actually extend beyond the regular 'kind' of perlorism ----- as in not necessarily petals/sepals imitating the lip, and not necessarily the radial symmetry thing. Just saying 'irregular' could be workable too ----- different from the usual looks.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top