C. Duvaliana (C. leuddemannia coerulea x C. purpurata alba ‘Red Carmin’

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A few years ago Jerry Fischer remade several old crosses that were not available anymore, with what he says are superior parents. In the case of this one from 1898, C. Duvaliana (C. luddemanniana coerulea x C. purpurata-alba ‘Red Carmin’), I think he hit a home run. It has such a unique strong fragrance (root beer) it scents the entire grow room in the morning.
I was asked about slitting open the sheath. The sheaths on this plant grow very long before opening and this one started opening before the flowers had cleared the top of it causing the flowers to really crowd each other. I slit it a couple of inches so I could separate them better. That’s the only reason I did it is because with two sheaths and 8 flowers, I needed to do what I could so they would present reasonably well. I don’t know how the judges would view that in AOS judging, so maybe DrLeslieEe could help us there. The slit sheath does not really show here very well, but here are the photos.
780BA2BB-0DE1-4481-B573-3F1BF8AC8095.jpeg


5A344474-6DDD-4C97-A239-968AC226CD7E.jpeg
 

tomp

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A few years ago Jerry Fischer remade several old crosses that were not available anymore, with what he says are superior parents. In the case of this one from 1898, C. Duvaliana (C. luddemanniana coerulea x C. purpurata-alba ‘Red Carmin’), I think he hit a home run. It has such a unique strong fragrance (root beer) it scents the entire grow room in the morning.
I was asked about slitting open the sheath. The sheaths on this plant grow very long before opening and this one started opening before the flowers had cleared the top of it causing the flowers to really crowd each other. I slit it a couple of inches so I could separate them better. That’s the only reason I did it is because with two sheaths and 8 flowers, I needed to do what I could so they would present reasonably well. I don’t know how the judges would view that in AOS judging, so maybe DrLeslieEe could help us there. The slit sheath does not really show here very well, but here are the photos.
780BA2BB-0DE1-4481-B573-3F1BF8AC8095.jpeg


View attachment 34008
SB. I don’t believe opening a sheath to help prevent trapping the flowers would be viewed as “manipulation“ by judges.
I have a C. Rubin (purpurata x sincoriana) that has so much substance that if I don’t catch it soon enough it tends to cripple some of the flowers.
 
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SB. I don’t believe opening a sheath to help prevent trapping the flowers would be viewed as “manipulation“ by judges.
I have a C. Rubin (purpurata x sincoriana) that has so much substance that if I don’t catch it soon enough it tends to cripple some of the flowers.
Thanks! I imagine removing the sheath entirely would be a problem, though?
 

Carmella.carey

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David, all 8 flowers are open in the first photo.
Thanks! I imagine removing the sheath entirely would be a problem, though?
I have a purpurata 'Gilbert Rubra' I still think it's weird that a simi-alba has rubra in its name but Okay, if I don't cut the sheeth right above the buds as soon as I notice the darkness of the buds the flowers will try to open in the sheeth as the sheeth is almost 12 inches tall.
PatrickIMG_20220427_084145.jpg
 

Rosebud1920

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A few years ago Jerry Fischer remade several old crosses that were not available anymore, with what he says are superior parents. In the case of this one from 1898, C. Duvaliana (C. luddemanniana coerulea x C. purpurata-alba ‘Red Carmin’), I think he hit a home run. It has such a unique strong fragrance (root beer) it scents the entire grow room in the morning.
I was asked about slitting open the sheath. The sheaths on this plant grow very long before opening and this one started opening before the flowers had cleared the top of it causing the flowers to really crowd each other. I slit it a couple of inches so I could separate them better. That’s the only reason I did it is because with two sheaths and 8 flowers, I needed to do what I could so they would present reasonably well. I don’t know how the judges would view that in AOS judging, so maybe DrLeslieEe could help us there. The slit sheath does not really show here very well, but here are the photos.
780BA2BB-0DE1-4481-B573-3F1BF8AC8095.jpeg


View attachment 34008
Just lovely, would love a division from a fellow Virginian. Can’t see more than one photo and just really one bloom in full. Can see the back of one or two. i couldn’t get but one photo to come up. Maybe I’m not doing something right. It’s certainly beautiful but couldn’t see the purpose of the post - talking about the slit sheath nor all the blooms on it. Would have been so nice to have seen it in full bloom.
 

Rosebud1920

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Oh my heavens — just found this going down through more comments. Just absolutely glorious. Just 💗 this. This is how cattleyas can be so spectacular and more so as they get even larger— when not constantly being repotted and cut down and set back for several years each time. If left to grow into specimen types where they just get bigger and better all the time, they are show stoppers —

A fellow Virginia orchid lover says “You did a great job raising this baby and should be quite proud and I know you are!”. 🥳😎
 
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