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artificial logs for epiphytes...

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paphioboy

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about 6 months ago, i started to experiment with DIY artificial logs to mount my epiphytes. all i used was thick, but rather flexible plastic netting. i shaped it into a cylinder and bound it with wire, then stuffed it with various medium (sphag, coconut husk, wood chips etc).. i find this method useful to maintain bulbos in shape, especially those with long rhizomes and scraggly growth habits.. i can just tie the rhizomes to the plastic netting so they don't grow all over the place. works great for dends that send out may keikis too... the results:
1. Bulbo. reticulatum and subumbellatum sharing a log stuffed with sphag:

2. Bulbo patens:

3. Coelogyne mayeriana:

4. Bulbo medusae (spiking now, under this treatment.. :D)

5. Dend parishii:

6. Aerides odorata:
 

Rick

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That's pretty cool Paphioboy.:clap:

One time I ran out of baskets to set up a Gongora, so I fashioned a system like that out of plastic netting. I started the plant inside the net, and as it produced new growths I would cut out more squares of the net to make room for the growths. Ultimately it turned into a solid mass of roots, bulbs, CHC, and a little bit of plastic.
 

SlipperFan

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Interesting idea. I wonder what would happen if you filled those frames with materials that don't decompose, like leca or diatomite.
 

Rick

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Interesting idea. I wonder what would happen if you filled those frames with materials that don't decompose, like leca or diatomite.
As long as the humidity was ample it would probably work. I'm waiting (daring!)
the first person to mount a sanderianum on a leca filled log.:poke::poke:

I know someone who mounted a henryanum on a piece of limestone.
 

gonewild

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As long as the humidity was ample it would probably work. I'm waiting (daring!)
the first person to mount a sanderianum on a leca filled log.:poke::poke:
Is that a double dog dare? :fight:

What would be the reason it would not grow?
I have sanderianum seedlings growing in pots of leca and I don't see that they would care if the pot was a "log" instead.
 

paphioboy

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i suppose a sanderianum wouldn't have enough humidity in a leca-filled log... the growing environment would have to be very wet... i think a leca-filled log will be better suited for angraecoids...

btw, Rick, speaking of gongoras... i have one, and it seems to be the fastest-growing epiphyte i have. it can mature a bulb in about 3 months... do gongoras need drying periods in order to bloom? thanks...
 

Rick

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I may be one of the last people you want to talk to about Gongoras, Paphioboy

I've only had 3 and although they grow like weeds only one has bloomed regularly for me. Some friends in my society have several species (and are now in possession of the one in the net basket). In their GH they don't seem to have regular seasons, and they say that something is always in spike or blooming.

I started keeping them pretty bright but the one that grew the best and bloomed the most was the truncata in the net basket in the coolest, darkest, breeziest spot in the GH. I finally got one to bloom that I've been growing for 5 years, and I think its because I left the shade cloth over this spot this summer, and decreased the overall temps with the new swamp cooler.

I also think that because of the association with ants that Gongoras like low pH, and the water where my friends to good with their Gongoras is normally less than 5!

I don't think the bulk of Gongora species need a winter dry period.
 
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Grandma M

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That looks like a great idea.

I still am amazed at all the little roots just sticking out into the air. Possibly I am a neetnick, I think they should grow into the spag and not look so wierd. I have a few bulbos and just ordered a couple more. Possibly one day I will get tired of their misbehavior and decide, if they will not grow nice and neat, ......like I think a plant should, they will find their was into that green box in my garage They also take so much care keeping the roots moist. That is one reason I only have a couple of vandas. Too much daily work, so maybe they will join the bulbos in the green box.

I'm not sure the vandas are the right thing for me to grow. I have a difficult time getting them to rebloom. Only my Princess Mikasa 'Indigo' like to rebloom for me.
 

paphioboy

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Update...

The results after a year:
Aerides odorata is really taking off... A lot of hanging fat new roots..

This bulbo hybrid (appendiculatum x macranthum) has colonized the entire log..

Dendrobium parishii:

Coelogyne pandurata also has covered the log with pseudobulbs:

Bulbo patens:

And Bulbo subumbellatum:
 

JeanLux

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about 6 months ago, i started to experiment with DIY artificial logs to mount my epiphytes. all i used was thick, but rather flexible plastic netting. i shaped it into a cylinder and bound it with wire, then stuffed it with various medium (sphag, coconut husk, wood chips etc).. i find this method useful to maintain bulbos in shape, especially those with long rhizomes and scraggly growth habits.. i can just tie the rhizomes to the plastic netting so they don't grow all over the place. works great for dends that send out may keikis too...
Seems to work super with your climate!!!! Did you do select the 'filling' stuff according to the species, or at random?? Jean
 
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biothanasis

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Lovely !!! It really works!!! I have made some for my plants and stuffed them with sphagnum!!! I could not get those hanging baskets and I found this solution easier and creative...:D
 

paphioboy

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Jean, the filling is according to species requirements and the size of the 'log'.. As you can see, I used some styrofoamm for both the bulbo hybrid and patens because they like it drier, and more fernroot/sphag for subumbellatum.. one advantage of this method is fertilising is very easy. I just drop a few sheep dung pellets at the top of the 'log', then as I water, it will dissolve and will be absorbed by the fernroot.. Hence, the orchid roots will be able to take up nutrients slowly and the roots don't burn.. This method is especially suitable for Coel pandurata.. it even knows how to climb up the 'tree branch' now.. hehe.. :p
 

SlipperKing

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By the looks of Paphioboy's growing environment (and the mossy brick walls) he could hang any orchid by a wire and nothing else, including P sanderianum, it would thrive and bloom! Your place looks dripping wet humid!
 
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P-chan

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That's awesome! I can't wait to have a greenhouse setting where I can do cool stuff like that! :D
 

paphioboy

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Rick, yes, my place is humid, which is why I think I might have been overwatering my paphs all this time.. I'm trying to use a more open medium mix, especially for barbatas, which almost always fail to thrive under my care.. BTW, the brick wall belongs to my neighbour.. :p
 

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