Are compots worth it for a beginner?

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

ohio-guy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2006
Messages
551
Reaction score
1
Location
Central Ohio
I am thinking of trying a phrag compot, and wondered if I tried if I might be getting in over my head. On the one hand , it seems a good value, but on the other, how long will I wait for a bloom? And of course, will I keep the plants alive? What has been the experience of others? What do you typically see for time from compot to bloom, and how do you determine when to pot up? I was looking at orchid babies site, and they even have a couple mini compots with just a few plants. They recommend triploid crosses as having more vigor and larger flowers....any input from more seasoned growers would be appreciated.
 

Rick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
12,765
Reaction score
3
Location
Leiper's Fork, TN
Time to blooming will depend on what species or hybrid you are interested in.

I have found that many phrags mature faster than paphs, so you might have flasklings bloom as early as 2 to 3 years out of flask. But typically you should expect 3 to 4 years.

I have gotten back a couple of flasks of phrags back from Troy Meyers and found they are very easy to grow, with virtually no losses. So I'd say go for it if the price is right.

Also I've known Earl from Orchid Babies for a few years now, and the plants I've got from him have done very well.
 

bwester

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2006
Messages
1,238
Reaction score
1
only if you have patience, young grasshopper.
 

littlefrog

Hop-meister
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
1,195
Reaction score
148
Location
Mid Michigan
I don't think compots are all that challenging. Getting them established from flask into compot is still challenging for me, and I've been doing it for longer than I care to admit.

If the compot is well established (say, out of flask for 6-9 months), then you should have no particular difficulties. It is a good way to get new breeding before most other people get the cross. If they are ready to go (overflowing the pot, usually), pot out the biggest ones, and put the smallest ones back into 'mini-compots' of 4 or 5 plants each in a smallish pot.

The main problem with buying compots is that you are unlikely to have space to bloom them all out. You can sell or trade your extra seedlings when they are established. When I was first growing orchids, we would often form a group of interested people and split up flasks or compots 4 or 5 ways. If 5 people each buy a flask, you can get a few each of 5 different things.
 

NYEric

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
48,611
Reaction score
415
Location
New York City Apartment
:) Everything said below is correct. First you have to be patient; then you have to have pots and media and room. After years of trying I finally learned what I can grow w/ my cultural techniques, I found that it was more rewarding if I got the most mature plants I could rather than flasks or compots. But that's just me; if you want to have a lot of one cross then go for it.
 
E

Eric Muehlbauer

Guest
If you want to try compots, then by all means go for phrags...they(for the most part) are much faster to grow and reach blooming size than paphs..aside from already being fast growing, its because they not only forgive bad or negelected media, they even seem to prefer it sometimes. My first compot was in fact a phrag Eric Young, flavum...all bloomed out within at most 3 years (I think it was really 2...) I gave all away in the end, because they were too repetitive ..my complaint about phrag hybrids in general...but for a starter, phrag compots are a great bet. Take care, Eric
 

NYEric

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
48,611
Reaction score
415
Location
New York City Apartment
Eric Muehlbauer said:
I gave all away in the end, because they were too repetitive ..my complaint about phrag hybrids in general...but for a starter, phrag compots are a great bet. Take care, Eric
The fine and subtle distinctions are what make the various crosses delightfull and sublime. :rollhappy:
 
P

Park Bear

Guest
littlefrog said:
I don't think compots are all that challenging. Getting them established from flask into compot is still challenging for me, and I've been doing it for longer than I care to admit.

If the compot is well established (say, out of flask for 6-9 months), then you should have no particular difficulties. It is a good way to get new breeding before most other people get the cross. If they are ready to go (overflowing the pot, usually), pot out the biggest ones, and put the smallest ones back into 'mini-compots' of 4 or 5 plants each in a smallish pot.

The main problem with buying compots is that you are unlikely to have space to bloom them all out. You can sell or trade your extra seedlings when they are established. When I was first growing orchids, we would often form a group of interested people and split up flasks or compots 4 or 5 ways. If 5 people each buy a flask, you can get a few each of 5 different things.
I agree with everything.....I've had more trouble establishing from flask to compot.
 

Latest posts

Top