Anemones

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Critters' started by John M, Jun 26, 2017.

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  1. Jun 26, 2017 #1

    John M

    John M

    John M

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    'Bought a little box with 10 dry tubers in February from the hardware store. I potted them all in an 8" pot and got them started in the greenhouse. So far, I've had 4 flowers. They're not really robust. I wonder if that's how they are; or if I'm not growing them right? Anyway, I did get a couple nice, colourful flowers out together a couple weeks ago.
     

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  2. Jun 26, 2017 #2

    Ozpaph

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    they are very pretty......................but I was expecting the undersea type!
     
  3. Jun 26, 2017 #3

    Wendy

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    Very pretty John! I have Anemone canadensis in our garden. It's white. Maybe next spring I can get a division for you.
     
  4. Jun 26, 2017 #4

    Happypaphy7

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    I love these, but never had luck in trying the ones sold in the early spring.
    I did much better in the past with cold ( not freezing) winter. Same with other tubers and corms like ranunculus, freesias, etc unless the package specifies that they have already been cold treated.
     
  5. Jun 27, 2017 #5

    John M

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    LOL! I did try one of them in my salt water fish tank; but, it didn't survive. I'll stick with the vegetable kind.

    That'd be great, Wendy. Thanks! I've got the pefect spot for them near the Cyps.

    I purchased these as spring planting tubers. They grew; but, flowering is sparse. I wish I could get them to bloom profusely. That'd be a magnificent sight!
     
  6. Jun 27, 2017 #6

    abax

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    These are lovely and the colors are intense. I have tons
    of Japanese Anemone in my garden and they're VERY
    easy to grow and bloom in the fall. I have both the white
    and the pink. They're almost invasive, but it's so nice to
    have them when almost everything else is going dormant.
     
  7. Jun 27, 2017 #7

    KyushuCalanthe

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    You have to love this genus, some really beautiful flowers, and these "hardware store" varieties are lovely.
     
  8. Jun 29, 2017 #8

    SlipperFan

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    I love these. I will have to look for these colorful ones.
     
  9. Jul 12, 2017 #9

    cnycharles

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    nice colors. we sell canadensis and some hybrids at work. they are truly ephemeral, the plant parts are not sturdy
     
  10. Jul 12, 2017 #10

    John M

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    I believe that. This pot full of tubers has already finished and the foliage died down. I have unpotted the tubers (larger now) and put them into the fridge for a rest.
     
  11. Jul 15, 2017 #11

    Happypaphy7

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    That seems like a super early forcing rather than resting as it just lost leaves.
    As I understand, they rest during the dry warm summer and then during the cold ( not freezing) winter, the foliage energy again, flowering in the early spring.

    I would be interested to see how things go with yours.
     
  12. Jul 15, 2017 #12

    John M

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    Hmmm; maybe I should remove them from the fridge and rest them in the pot, dry, at normal, ambient summertime temperatures?
     
  13. Jul 15, 2017 #13

    Happypaphy7

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    I think that would be safer?

    While on this topic, bulbs like tulips and hyacinths develop (differentiation is more correct way to refer to it, I think?) flower buds deep inside the bulbs in the fall, then grow mainly just roots during the late fall before the freezing weather sets in. As the winter nears the end, the leaves and flower stalks grow fast.

    Now, with tubers like ranunculus and anemones, they will sprout leaves and develop into a good sized clump during the winter (cold but not freezing climate), and then flowers in the spring.
    So, I don't know if sticking these tubers in the fridge will work as forcing like one would do with tulip bulbs?
     
  14. Jul 15, 2017 #14

    KyushuCalanthe

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    John, I'd keep them at normal temps in a dryish state throughout the summer and fall. Keep them above freezing during the winter and replant in spring. Likely you have A. coronaria, a native of the Mediterranean and known to be a finicky plant to keep over a long period unless you live in the right climate for it. Most folks in cooler climates treat them as annuals.

    I've grown A. nemorosa and A. kiushianum in cooler areas without much trouble, in fact the former can make big colonies. They die down after flowering, but that is normal. Both are woodland plants and make good companion plants for Cyps.
     
  15. Jul 16, 2017 #15

    John M

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    Thank you both. I've removed the pot from the fridge. I'm going to keep it near the electrical panel in the greenhouse (to be sure I don't accidentally water it) and wait until February, or for new growth before I begin watering again. The box had 10 tubers; but, I only got 5 flowers in total. I'd like to be able to grow these up into larger bulbs and get a better show of flowers in the future.
     

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