A photo of C. arietinum in situ

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
I took this photo of Cypripedium arietinum while out with friends last week. Its bloom is long spent but there it was in all its glory. We looked around that area for more but there were only two plants. We've got gps coordinates on these two plants so we'll go back and check on them next spring. There were several other areas on this particular property that had arietinum but no population exceeded 10 plants. We found no spade marks from poachers and we didn't find any atv tracks that would have indicated plants might have been destroyed. We did find that several of the areas in which the arietinum were growing were being encroached by invasive species so we spent some time in those areas and removed the nasties. I had a handy dandy little v tool with me and others had thick work gloves so the work went fast.



Sorry the photo isn't the greatest. Thought others might enjoy seeing a photo of this plant in the wild.
 

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
Yes, I'm sort of excited myself. I've only been up there in and around the third week of May twice that I can remember. Most of the orchids are in bloom up there around that time so I really would like to drive up for a weekend when they are most likely to be in bloom. Otherwise, somebody else can take a photo and forward it to me. We know exactly where those two orchids are. When we were there, we found several different species of Platanthera as well as Spiranthes in bloom and there were hordes of hardy native orchids that were pointed out to me that weren't in bloom. That was fun to see the spike poking out from in and amongst grasses. We also all started jumping up and down on mats of sphagnum in one area where there were carnivorous plants to give my girlfriend the queezies. Two of the men we were with had to have been at least 200 lbs so they were able to really get the ground to quake. I guess we over did it because she bailed ship and left the area as fast as she could. She looked a little green. We all yelled for her to come on back to enjoy the adult trampolines but she would have none of it.

I don't know that anyone would be interested but if there is someone out there who is conservation oriented who would be interested in a tour of a virtually pristine site in exchange for a few hours of hand weeding (tee he, had to insert that), I'm sure the steward would have no issues with a visitor or two.
 
C

cdub

Guest
That's a pretty cool find. I don't mean to be nosey but was this in Illinois like your location indicates? I didn't know arietinum was there. Sounds like a cool preserve.
 

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
The arietinum are located on a 3600 acre property in Upper Michigan. Oddly enough, the site is not that far away from where I grew up and even closer to where we have a little summer home.

I didn't find the C. arietinum. The plants were inventoried for a project and the person who found them spent a few days at the property with me and a few others and to be quite blunt with you, I would have walked right past them had he not pointed them out to me. I was too busy looking at fungi. I am particularly fond of fungi. In bloom, I would have spotted the arietinum... out of bloom and no way would I have spotted them without his assistance. I was able to spot all the carnivorous plants that they were walking right past though if that counts for anything. They literally buzzed right by hundreds of teeny tiny Drosera rotundifolia and didn't even spot them. It was amazing. I found D. linearis on the far north side of the property which is probably one of the best finds and that plant didn't appear on any of their lists so they'll have to document it and add it. I also found one Sarracenia purpurea ssp purpurea f. heterophylla. That's an anthocyanin free purp and they're not all that common. That was really exciting to me although the others were sort of ho hum about it. We all have such varied interests that it was sort of interesting watching everyone going in different directions to pursue their lusts.

They have documented almost 30 different hardy native orchids on the property. If one is into native orchids, this is a must see site.

I am very interested in arietinum because I ordered a few to be delivered to me next spring. From the looks of the arietinum I saw growing in the mixed deciduous woodlands up there, I should be able to grow mine down here.
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
That does sound like fun, except ..... I'd have no idea what a was looking for! I'm glad you said you would have walked right over them, had they not been pointed out! I certainly understand with all your interests in a variety of plants & trees, it would be easy to do!
 

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
With a glass of wine or two I'm told they all start looking alike. Those types of plants all start looking alike to me without the glass of wine or two if that makes you feel any better. They were trying to show me the difference between the parviflorums and about all I could spot was little parviflorums and big parviflorums. You start getting slap happy after a few days out there with people who are all into different species and different plant communities.

Yes, I get my nose stuck in trees all the time and I have been known to take off after dragonflies and damselflies before too. You have some very nice conifers that one could easily get their nose stuck in. I particularly like your Uncle Fogey. That's a favorite of mine and always has been.
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
Ooohhh I was amazed early this evening, around 6:30pm I had an agility lesson & there were tons of dragonflies & damselflies. The darn mosquitoes were attempting to eat us alive even with bug spray on. I began focusing on the individual mosquitoes & it was so cool - now you see it, now you don't! In mid air they were just picking off those mosquitoes left & right!!!
 

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
Dragonflies can be hard to identify. The males look different than the females which look different from the juveniles. That's why I try to chase down and get a good look at them. I'm always curious which species flew by. You had one big bomber of a dragonfly go by me that I've never seen before. I was going to take off after it but got hung up in the Ginkgo.

My property here has a wetlands on it as well as a few natural ponds. my yard is alive with dragonflies, damselflies, and bats at night. They're all going for the skeeters and it just makes my heart do little leaps of joy. I've got tiny little solar powered garden lights by decorative water features and some of the local frogs hang out by the lights eating anything that flies in front of their faces.

Hey speaking of things overhead, have you been watching the skies today? Waukegan Airport has some sort of an air show I think and all types of vintage aircraft are flying over. Old bombers and bi-wings and a host of other planes. They're flying real low too so you can get a good look.
 

cnycharles

Peloric keiki
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
9,661
Reaction score
124
Location
elmer, nj
I am very interested in arietinum because I ordered a few to be delivered to me next spring. From the looks of the arietinum I saw growing in the mixed deciduous woodlands up there, I should be able to grow mine down here.
Hello,
I once tried to find some ram's head in catalogs and wasn't able to find any. Where were you able to buy your plants?
thanks,
charles
 

Heather

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
10,484
Reaction score
19
Location
Sacramento, CA. Outside w/ Southeast Exposure
arietinum is one of the hardest to find in nature and grow in culture, as far as I am aware. I'll ask around at work and find out if we have anything growing seed-wise at the nursery.

(Charles, I work for NE Wild Flower Society and we are propagating a lot of Cypripediums. Check us out at: www.newenglandWILD.org)
 

KyushuCalanthe

Just call me Tom
Joined
Jan 12, 2008
Messages
7,795
Reaction score
70
Location
Kyushu, Japan; warm temperate/subtropical climate
arietinum is one of the hardest to find in nature and grow in culture, as far as I am aware.
Heather is right - this species is one of the more difficult ones to keep going in the long term. For that reason they are not commonly cultivated and rarely sold in typical catalogs. A couple possible sources include:

Planteck - they say adult plants will be available this spring.

Phtesia - they have had seedlings in the past, but aren't currently listing them as available.

Vermont Ladyslipper Co. also has these in production, but as yet have offered any.

If you are a new comer to growing Cyps I would highly recommend you start with other species first, such as C. parviflorum. Also, if you can't keep soil temperatures quite low (no greater than 65 F) you will very likely find this species frustrating to grow at all.

Good luck in your search!
 

cnycharles

Peloric keiki
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
9,661
Reaction score
124
Location
elmer, nj
arietinum is one of the hardest to find in nature and grow in culture, as far as I am aware. I'll ask around at work and find out if we have anything growing seed-wise at the nursery.

(Charles, I work for NE Wild Flower Society and we are propagating a lot of Cypripediums. Check us out at: www.newenglandWILD.org)
sounds good, thanks. i've seen it in one spot in ny tiny plants and one spot in vermont very large plants. I checked out the links, what is the process for shipping arietinum out of flask across borders?

about the website for where you work, I saw a job notice for a 'Plant Propagation Specialist, Nasami Farm' but it states that the application date must be jan. 4th; is this position filled and is there any chance I could get an application in? I would be very interested,........
thanks,
charles
 

cnycharles

Peloric keiki
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
9,661
Reaction score
124
Location
elmer, nj
Heather is right - this species is one of the more difficult ones to keep going in the long term. For that reason they are not commonly cultivated and rarely sold in typical catalogs. A couple possible sources include:

Planteck - they say adult plants will be available this spring.

Phtesia - they have had seedlings in the past, but aren't currently listing them as available.

Vermont Ladyslipper Co. also has these in production, but as yet have offered any.

If you are a new comer to growing Cyps I would highly recommend you start with other species first, such as C. parviflorum. Also, if you can't keep soil temperatures quite low (no greater than 65 F) you will very likely find this species frustrating to grow at all.

Good luck in your search!
thanks. I checked out the links. there are quite a few places here in ny where they had been found in situ, some may still have them here or there but if you aren't there at the right time, you won't see them. i know that the ny natural heritage program found or re-found several sites here in ny this last year. i know I could grow yellow ladyslippers but don't have a yard, and I keep my refrigerator too full to put them there in the winter! :) I have also been looking for sources of seed or seedlings of eastern calypso so I can try to introduce them in a few spots where they may have been in the past or it seems like they would grow. I found a source for western calypso and though it would be cool to see them out here I would rather try to re-introduce the ones that were here before. I have some interest in the southern small yellow ladyslipper, as it is supposed to have been here and there on the edges of NY in the past, but when looking at sites on the internet it's hard to tell sometimes if they are offering standard yellow ladyslippers, northern small yellow (makasin) or southern small yellow (parviflorum). the two smalls definitely live in different areas, soil chemistry-wise

too many ideas, too little time, space money and all of that

thanks for the help,
charles
 
G

goldenrose

Guest
CHARLES - the Lorax may take a while to reply, she is on vacation.
 

NYEric

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
48,671
Reaction score
428
Location
New York City Apartment
I was wondering about this thread-bump. Later this year when I'm in Ill. we'll have to go looking for native species. :D Oh, and we must have a wild mushroom fest since someone's interested in fungi!
 

TheLorax

Awardless studette
Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
808
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Illinois
Hi, I'm back but am exhausted.

I'll have to check my records but if I am not mistaken, I am importing this from the UK... and yes... I have the appropriate import permits and he will provide a phytosanitary certificate. Bad news, they were kinda pricey if memory serves me.

Wish me well with the plants I am buying because if they survive, I share.

Eric! I love shrooms! I can show you where quite a few interesting species are growing. You will be in shroom heaven.
 
Top