A hobby that will light you up!

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Critters' started by SlipperKing, Nov 2, 2012.

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  1. Nov 2, 2012 #1

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

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    The wife got into a very hot hobby about two years back and I thought you all might enjoy it as well.

    Here is one of her hottest plants currently bearing fruit. Doesn't it look yummy?
    [​IMG]
    Here is a closeup. It's a beautiful red! Ready to pop it into your mouth yum yum!
    [​IMG]
    OR DARE YOU!
    This is supposedly one of the hottest pepper known to mankind
    Trinidad Scorpion, "Butch T" pepper Trust me, it is hot coming in at ~1.4 million scoville units of heat
    Here are a couple not quit ready but turning
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    A very green one. Notice the "stem" on the bottom. This how it gets its name scorpion from the stinger of a scorpion.
    [​IMG]

    One of my favorites and grows wild here in Texas, Chili Pristine peppers. They are very tiny but have a hell of kick to them
    The orange ones are ripe
    [​IMG]
    My hand for size
    [​IMG]
    There are no Ghost peppers at the moment but soon. The flower of the Bhut Jolokia or Ghost pepper. Most pepper flowers all look the same as this
    [​IMG]
    What about the common old Jalapeno pepper? In the garden
    Not ready. taste like a bell pepper at this point. Scoville units a mere 2500 to 5000.
    [​IMG]
    These guys are ready! (Plants a bit dehydrated)
    [​IMG]
    She has a few others including one called, Peter pepper
     
  2. Nov 2, 2012 #2
    I grew a bunch of Butch Ts, Naga Vipers, and red and yellow jolokias. butch t is very, very hot!!!!! I gave several to NYEric....I'm sure he'll share his experience. next year I want to grow Trinidad moruga......2 million Su's!
     
  3. Nov 2, 2012 #3

    Justin

    Justin

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    i'm so jealous you are growing these...i love hot peppers.
     
  4. Nov 2, 2012 #4
    Those would go awesome in my mixed drink of strawberries puréed with chilies (hopefully the ones that bite back) with rum or vodka!!!!!!! It's the drink you tend to not get drunk on because you fear the repercussions in the morning as it comes out, lol...
     
  5. Nov 2, 2012 #5

    likespaphs

    likespaphs

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    some call me brian

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    do those have pest issues or does the hot keep things away?
     
  6. Nov 2, 2012 #6

    SlipperFan

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    Pepper plants in general don't seem to have many pests, at least not in my garden.

    Beautiful red-on-fire!
     
  7. Nov 2, 2012 #7

    Rick

    Rick

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    That's very cool Rick. You could also try adding them to hot chocolate. Aztecs used to do that. I've added chili powder to chocolate and its very good that way.

    I actually had an Anhahiem plant get demolished by tomato horn worns.

    Obviously not hot enough!!!

    I like to grow big poblanos when I have the garden growing.
     
  8. Nov 2, 2012 #8
    the hot ones are easy to grow and have no pests. the sweet peppers always get rots when the fruits get ripe.
     
  9. Nov 2, 2012 #9

    Hera

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    I tried growing some hots, but the summer just wasn't long enough to get a good crop. The little ones are pretty......and pretty hot!
     
  10. Nov 2, 2012 #10

    wjs2nd

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    I have seven ghost peppers ready to be picked. I'm not sure yet what I want to do with them. I've grown my ghost pepper inside all summer (I wasn't sure if the season would be long enough).
     
  11. Nov 2, 2012 #11

    nikv

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    So where do you all get your pepper plants or seeds? Do you exchange with others or is there a website where one can buy them? I think I'd like to give them a try.
     
  12. Nov 2, 2012 #12

    karategirl73

    karategirl73

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    I grow hot peppers every year in my garden. Chicago had a nice long really hot summer, so my peppers did excellent this year. I grow jolokias, chocolate habaneros, carribean red habaneros, peach habaneros, and this year for the first time black habaneros. I slice them up, put them in the food dehydrator for hours until the moisture is out. Then I put them in a plastic bag, put a kitchen towel under the plastic bag, and roll them out with a rolling pin. They are the best hot pepper flakes on a pizza!! But beware unbelieveably hot.
     
  13. Nov 2, 2012 #13

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

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    You need to move to Texas Justin! I did from Zanesville!


    There are a number of places on the web that sell seeds and plants. All but the jalapenos are in pots.
     
  14. Nov 2, 2012 #14

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

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    Eric M. had sent me some seeds of his different jolokias this spring and I gave the seeds to a friend whose family has a large garden stand/greenhouses and sells tons of fruits and vegetables, flowers etc; I supplied the seed with the understanding that I would receive a few seedlings that they had started and try a few of them out. Interest was very strong when he started telling others that he had them available, so I ended up not getting to try any of them. I tried some hot salsa with jolokias in it the first time I visited new mexico two years ago; it was just too hot to enjoy! I'm actually going to make some of my own home-made chili honey soon, with hatch red peppers, dried and ground in honey. It's very good, sweet with some heat!

    It was interesting seeing the unusual 'pepper-heads' who were showing up at my friends' greenhouses, hoping to find jolokia peppers (lol); many had quite unusual personalities :rollhappy:
     
  15. Nov 2, 2012 #15

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

    cnycharles

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    be careful looking online for jolokia seeds/plants, do some research before you settle on a seed/plant supplier. there are unscrupulous people who will send you either fake seeds, or those that aren't truly what they are listing for sale. others have the right thing (or not), but take advantage of the strong interest in jolokias and the other very hot or hotter peppers and charge very steep prices; in any case, they will be more expensive than standard veggie/sweet pepper seeds.
     
  16. Nov 2, 2012 #16

    wjs2nd

    wjs2nd

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    I'll have some seeds for a ghost pepper plant. I just need to cut open the pepper and dry everything out. Want to trade something? I'll take a picture of my plant tomorrow morning and post a picture. Ghost peppers have to have their flowers pollinated by hand. I just used a q-tip and rubbed all the flowers.
     
  17. Nov 3, 2012 #17
    I've gotten most of my seeds on eBay. this year's batch was good, and accurately labelled to the best of my knowledge. but the previous years order got me a bunch of mostly mongrels that were all mixed and not true to label. great peppers, and really hot, but not what they were supposed to be. cross pollination of parents is the biggest problem with buying these seeds.
     
  18. Nov 3, 2012 #18

    wjs2nd

    wjs2nd

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    I had some time tonight. Here is my Ghost pepper.:evil:
     

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  19. Nov 3, 2012 #19

    NYEric

    NYEric

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    I tried one of Eric m's new batch and brought a few to the paintball field for some hijinks! Good stuff!
     
  20. Nov 3, 2012 #20

    paphioboy

    paphioboy

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    hehehe...

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    I find it interesting that a lot of pests actually find chilli/pepper plants delicious. Maybe because capsaicin is only found in the fruits and seeds.
     

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