Search results

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
  1. Ray

    Growing orchids in Alaska

    Superthrive, K-L-N, and most other root growth stimulants contain synthetic auxins, which by themselves, are extremely effective. The problem is that in order to make them water soluble, they must be converted to mineral salts, and those are far less chemically stable. Dave Neal, who founded...
  2. Ray

    Growing orchids in Alaska

    Define "chemical gimmick", please.
  3. Ray

    Growing orchids in Alaska

    To where? Do you have contact info, Eric?
  4. Ray

    Growing orchids in Alaska

    Welcome! Naoki is a professor at U of A, Anchorage. Look at Lehua Orchids.
  5. Ray

    Phragmipedium Audrey (Twilight x Grande)

    Try once a day - you can probably manage that - in between chasing after your child!
  6. Ray

    Phrag. Xerophyticum 'April Fool' x self

    Just throwing it out there, in case some adventurous individual would like to try it. With my extremely limited plant space, I simply couldn't try it.
  7. Ray

    Phragmipedium Audrey (Twilight x Grande)

    @Djthomp28 & @Linus_Cello - mist the flowers, buds and spike with Kelpak solution. It contains phlorotannins that are known to slow senescence. I have a Phrag Lucky Girl that insists on blooming over the winter when I am forced to keep it in dry, indoor, less-than-ideal conditions, where it is...
  8. Ray

    Phrag. Xerophyticum 'April Fool' x self

    Muffin pan culture.
  9. Ray

    Lycaste in semi-hydroponics

    Yep. Most plants’ rest is more about “no nitrogen” than it is “no water”, so folks either just stop feeding plants in S/H, or stop watering. For plants that really do need to be dry, do the latter.
  10. Ray

    My First FCC to Phrag. Glen Decker

    Spectacular! Well done!
  11. Ray

    Salts from fertilisers

    Correct. The ingredients are boric acid, calcium nitrate, copper sulfate, iron EDTA (the chelated one), magnesium nitrate, manganese sulfate, potassium nitrate, potassium phosphate, sodium molybdate, zinc sulfate.
  12. Ray

    Bessae

    I’d say so! Nice.
  13. Ray

    Salts from fertilisers

    I guess my first question is “is Peters normal and MSU high, or is MSU normal and Peter’s low?”, or are both well in the range of usefulness and it doesn’t matter? I am only guessing that Peter’s uses the same raw materials, but in the MSU formulas, the only element that is chelated is iron.
  14. Ray

    Salts from fertilisers

    I’m gonna hafta disagree, Dave. Activated charcoal certainly adsorbs, but the horticultural charcoal we see for potting mixes doesn’t really have much area that’s activated at all (I’ve broken pieces that weren’t even burned to the center), and most of the accumulated residues are deposited and...
  15. Ray

    Paph Saiun 'Littlefrog' AM/AOS

    Seems to me that's pretty common with sukhakulii crosses.
  16. Ray

    After 40 years - rethinking my place in the world of orchids

    I am wondering who has sour grapes here, as once again you have made personal attacks on another individual for his opinion, and I see no posts by Tenman since the last time you did the same thing and were warned about it, a year ago: @big923cattleya, please desist from such attacks. This is...
  17. Ray

    Polystyrene strips as a potting medium

    Thin polystyrene is actually quite flexible. If I'm not mistaken, the feed material isn't more than 2-3 mm thick, and once passing through the shredder, probably compressed a bit. I once received a shipment of wine in which each bottle was wrapped in multiple layers of the stuff.
  18. Ray

    Polystyrene strips as a potting medium

    That doesn't surprise me. Diatomite was known for its super-small and extremely jagged/serpentine porosity. When dry, it soaks up liquids like mad, but doesn't release them rapidly (too much surface tension holding them in place). Short term, that's a good thing, but those jagged crevices...
Back
Top